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IWSA HAILS EPA'S CONFIRMATION THAT MWC ASH IS NOT A HAZARDOUS WASTE

IWSA HAILS EPA'S CONFIRMATION THAT MWC ASH IS NOT A HAZARDOUS WASTE
 WASHINGTON, Sept. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- The Integrated Waste Services Association (IWSA) today praised the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) determination that ash generated from municipal waste combustion (MWC -- also called waste-to-energy) is not to be regulated as a hazardous waste and can be safely managed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle D regulations.
 "This determination is a major breakthrough for solid waste managers in communities nationwide," commented Kent Burton, IWSA president. "It comfirms what the scientific evidence has revealed for the past decade -- namely that MWC ash is not hazardous and can be safely managed in MSW landfills."
 "MWC ash is exempt from regulation as a hazardous waste under RCRA Subtitle C," stated William K. Reilly, EPA administrator, in a Sept. 18 memorandum to EPA regional administrators. He said the "two statutory goals embodied in (RCRA) section 3001(i) -- protecting the environment and promoting resource recovery from non-hazardous solid waste -- are best served by exempting MWC ash from hazardous waste regulation."
 The determination reiterated the agency's support for MWC as an important component in integrated waste management because "the entire solid waste stream cannot be reduced through source reduction and recycling." The agency further noted that MWC, which "safely and effectively manages MSW," specifically advances two key RCRA objectives -- reducing the volume of waste that must be disposed of and recovering significant amounts of energy from MSW (municipal solid waste).
 "By recognizing the safety of MWC and the necessity of this option for communities nationwide," the IWSA president noted, "EPA has provided a vital element that has been missing in its MSW policies."
 "EPA encourages communities to choose the mix of solid waste options that are most appropriate for them, considering local economic, environmental and other factors," the agency said.
 Currently there are 142 WTE facilities operating in the United States which recover energy and materials from MSW remaining after recycling. Waste-to-energy plants manage about 16 percent of the nation's MSW and produce an equivalent amount of energy to supply about 1.3 million homes. These facilities operating nationwide offset the need for more than 31 million barrels of foreign oil each year.
 IWSA is a national trade association that advocates an integrated approach to solid waste management, which includes making optimal use of reduction, reuse, recycling, municipal waste combustion and landfilling to solve the nation's garbage dilemma. For more information, contact IWSA at 202-467-6240. The address is Two Lafayette Centre, 1133 21st St. N.W., Suite 205, Washington, D.C. 20036.
 -0- 9/22/92
 /CONTACT: Kent Burton of Integrated Waste Services Association, 202-467-6240/ CO: Integrated Waste Services Association; U.S. Environmental
 Protection Agency ST: District of Columbia IN: OIL SU:


IH -- DC044 -- 2400 09/22/92 17:42 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 22, 1992
Words:466
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