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INTERNATIONAL HVACR MANUFACTURER GROUP PROPOSES ACCELERATED CFC AND HCFC CONTROLS

 INTERNATIONAL HVACR MANUFACTURER GROUP PROPOSES ACCELERATED
 CFC AND HCFC CONTROLS
 ARLINGTON, Va., Feb. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Representatives of the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) manufactures' associations from Japan, Europe, Canada and the United States agreed Jan. 29 to recommend accelerated controls for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) to their respective national authorities under the Montreal Protocol for Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.
 The Montreal Protocol is the international agreement to limit worldwide emissions of ozone depleting chemicals.
 The group, the International Council of Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Manufacturers' Association (ICARMA) agreed at a meeting in Anaheim, Calif., to recommend the following control dates.
 CFCs
 (percent of 1986 world baseline production)
 Current Protocol ICARMA Proposal
 Jan. 1, 1992 100 60
 Jan. 1, 1993 100 50
 Jan. 1, 1994 100 40
 Jan. 1, 1995 50 25
 Jan. 1, 1996 50 0 for new equipment
 Jan. 1, 1997 15 0 for new equipment
 Jan. 1, 1998 15 0 for new equipment
 Jan. 1, 1999 15 0 for new equipment
 Jan. 1, 2000 0 0 for new equipment
 The elimination of CFC production in 1996 would apply to its use in new equipment manufactured after Jan. 1, 1996. Production of new equipment using CFCs would also be banned after Jan. 1, 1996. Production of a limited amount of CFCs to service essential existing refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment would be permitted.
 HCFCs
 ICARMA PROPOSAL
 ban use in new equipment 2010 (HCFC-22, 141b, 142b)
 2020 (HCFC-123)
 ban use in existing equipment 2020 (HCFC-22, 141b, 142b)
 2030 (HCFC-123)
 (Note: The current protocol has no mandatory controls for HCFCs. Proposed new equipment ban applies to production of equipment as well as refrigerant. The dates for HCFC-123 are consistent with U.S. Clean Air Act requirements.)
 The representatives agreed that phase out dates for HCFC-22, the primary refrigerant used in air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment, should be reassessed in future reviews of the Montreal Protocol because satisfactory alternatives for most HCFC-22 applications are not identified and proven.
 The representatives agreed that the proposed dates are necessary to permit full evaluation and testing of alternatives for toxicity, chemical compatibility, performance, global warming potential and other factors. Such testing should permit industry to identify satisfactory, environmentally desirable refrigerant alternatives by the year 2000. It will then require a period of 10 years for manufacturers to complete the necessary redesign, testing, retooling and production build-up for all products.
 The representatives endorsed the position that adequate supplies of CFCs and HCFCs will be required for servicing the existing inventory of essential equipment for a period of time after production of new equipment using these refrigerants is ended.
 The proposed international controls represent a significant acceleration of the current schedules provided in the Montreal Protocol. The representatives agreed that the need for reducing ozone depletion justifies accelerating the schedules to the extent that industry can support, with due regard for the economic impacts upon equipment users and the public. The proposed schedules represent an international industry recommendation to nations participating in the ongoing review of the Montreal Protocol.
 ICARMA members had previously agreed on the guiding principles for policies pertaining to international controls on CFC and HCFC chemicals. These principles formed the basis for the dates and specific control provisions agreed to at this meeting.
 ICARMA comprises representatives from the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI), the Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI), the European Committee of Air Handling and Air Conditioning Equipment Manufacturers (EUROVENT), the European Committee of Refrigeration Equipment Manufacturers (CECOMAF), and the Japan Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Industry Association (JRAIA). The council is administratively supported by ARI.
 -0- 2/6/92
 /CONTACT: Maura Shannon, senior vice president, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute, 703-524-8800/ CO: Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute ST: IN: SU:


TW-MK -- DC029 -- 7851 02/06/92 15:44 EST
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Date:Feb 6, 1992
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