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How to replace shear parts.

How to replace shear parts

When pruning shears break or wear out, do you just buy a new pair? You might be able to repair them for a much lower cost. If you do it now, you'll be ready for late winter and spring pruning.

Most major shear manufacturers sell parts for their own models. This makes it possible to replace a well-used blade, stretched spring, worn anvil, stripped screws, and other broken parts. Usually, a screwdriver and crescent wrench are the only tools you need.

If you have the widely sold brand of anviland-blade shears shown above ($12 new), you'll find a repair kit at places that sell the pruner. For $3.50, you get a replacement blade, anvil, and spring, as well as mounting screws and instructions. The kit fits only certain models; check the package label.

To get parts for other brands, bring your shears to a nursery or hardware store that sells that brand. Ask for the parts you need, showing the nurseryman or clerk if necessary. If the nursery has to order them, you may have to wait a week or so. In one line of $25 to $35 bypass pruners, you can replace the hook blade for $5.80 or the spring for 90 cents.

To make the changes, dismantle the shears by withdrawing exposed screws or nuts and lining up the parts in the order they come off. Replace whatever is broken or worn, then reassemble the parts in order. Lubricate with light oil.

Some manufacturers don't sell parts but may replace a broken pair of shears under the warranty; ask your dealer.

Photo: After removing screws, slip out worn anvil and chipped blade. Replace with new ones from repair kit, using new screws provided
COPYRIGHT 1986 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1986 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Sunset
Date:Feb 1, 1986
Words:292
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