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Homebuyer credit denied where former home still in use.

A house that a married couple continued to use while trying to sell it was their principal residence during that period; therefore, they did not meet the timing requirement to qualify for an $8,000 first-time homebuyer credit when they purchased a new house, the Tax Court held.

Francis and Maureen Foster put their former residence on the market in February 2006, and they began spending most of their time at Mrs. Foster's parents' house. The sale of the old house was finalized See finalization.  on June 6, 2007. They purchased a new house on July 28, 2009.

The Fosters claimed an $8,000 first-time homebuyer credit on their 2008 tax return, which the IRS An abbreviation for the Internal Revenue Service, a federal agency charged with the responsibility of administering and enforcing internal revenue laws.  denied.

Under Sec. 36(c), a "first-time homebuyer" was defined (the credit expired in 2010) as any individual who had had no present ownership interest in a principal residence for three years prior to the date of purchase of the principal residence for which the credit was being claimed.

The Fosters argued that they had stopped using their former house as a principal residence in February 2006 and therefore met the three-year period.

The Tax Court looked at all of the facts and circumstances and concluded that the old house remained the Fosters' principal residence after July 27, 2006. The court noted that they did not pay rent or utilities at Mrs. Foster's parents' house. Also, the Fosters continued to use their old address for certain purposes: on their 2005 tax returns (filed in October 2006), on Mrs. Foster's driver's license renewal in April 2006 and on a rental application in April 2007. Furthermore, while the old house was on the market, they kept it furnished, frequently stayed there overnight, hosted family gatherings in the house, and kept personal belongings belongings
Noun, pl

the things that a person owns or has with him or her

Noun 1. belongings - something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone; "that hat is my property"; "he is a man of
, accessed the Internet and received bills and correspondence there.

These facts led the court to hold that the old house remained the Fosters' principal residence after July 27, 2006, and therefore the required three years had not elapsed e·lapse  
intr.v. e·lapsed, e·laps·ing, e·laps·es
To slip by; pass: Weeks elapsed before we could start renovating.

n.
 before they purchased the new house. The court held that they thus were not entitled en·ti·tle  
tr.v. en·ti·tled, en·ti·tling, en·ti·tles
1. To give a name or title to.

2. To furnish with a right or claim to something:
 to claim the first-time homebuyer credit.

* Foster, 138 T.C. No. 4 (2012)
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Publication:Journal of Accountancy
Date:Apr 1, 2012
Words:359
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