Printer Friendly

HURRICANE ANDREW OFFERS CRITICAL LESSONS FOR HOME BUYERS

 HURRICANE ANDREW OFFERS CRITICAL LESSONS FOR HOME BUYERS
 TACOMA, Wash., Oct. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- Critical lessons for home buyers were learned in the wake of Hurricane Andrew, which struck south Florida and then Louisiana in late August 1992.
 Andrew damaged or destroyed some 80,000 homes in south Florida alone and caused upwards of $30 billion in damage, making it the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. Much of that damage and destruction could have been averted if simple, code-required construction practices had been observed, according to damage assessment investigations conducted in the wake of the storm.
 The Tacoma-based American Plywood Association (APA), for example, in a report entitled, "Hurricane Andrew -- Structural Performance of Buildings in Southern Florida," concluded that "conventionally built residential structures constructed with wood systems performed satisfactorily when the structures were built to meet building code provisions." APA, a nonprofit trade association founded in 1933, conducts applied research and operates a quality testing and inspection program for structural wood panel products. Those products include plywood and oriented strand board (OSB).
 The vast majority of building failures, according to APA, was due to lack of proper fastening and connections. In the case of roof sheathing, for example, common observations included fewer nails than required by code and nails that did not penetrate the roof trusses beneath the sheathing.
 APA engineers and field representatives also discovered that plywood and oriented strand board performed equally well during Hurricane Andrew. That was not surprising, they say, because both products are manufactured according to the same provisions of a performance standard that sets stringent performance requirements.
 Oriented strand board should not be confused with a variety of other "reconstituted wood" products. It is an engineered product made of fully waterproof adhesive and compressed wood strands arranged in layers at right angles to one another. Like plywood, OSB possesses the strength and stiffness properties that result from cross-laminated layers and is performance-rated for structural applications.
 So what are the lessons from Hurricane Andrew?
 -- First, said APA, select a contractor, whether for new construction or remodeling, who is recognized for quality work. Or, if you are buying a new home, investigate the reputation of the contractor.
 -- Second, as a consumer, be aware of the importance of proper fastening and connections to the overall structural integrity of your house.
 -- Third, insist on quality materials.
 -- And finally, be sure that your new house or remodeling project has been inspected by your local building inspection department to assure it meets all code requirements.
 For an easy-to-understand guide to proper construction techniques, write the American Plywood Association for a copy of its 36-page brochure "House Building Basics." Send $2 postage and handling to: American Plywood Association, P.O. Box 11700, Tacoma, WA 98411.
 -0- 10/22/92
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Line art is available upon request/
 /CONTACT: Jack Merry of the American Plywood Association, 206-565-6600/ CO: American Plywood Association ST: Washington, Florida IN: CST SU:


SW-LM -- SEFNS1 -- 3265 10/22/92 07:35 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 22, 1992
Words:496
Previous Article:PELLET STOVE SALES HEATING UP FOR THE WINTER, ACCORDING TO PYRO INDUSTRIES
Next Article:3M REPORTS HIGHER SALES AND EARNINGS
Topics:


Related Articles
HURRICANE ANDREW NEWS AVAILABLE ON COMPUSERVE
ITT HARTFORD RESPONDS TO HURRICANE ANDREW
EXPERTS CALL WINDOWS FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE AGAINST SEVERE STORM DAMAGE LAMINATED GLASS RECOMMENDED FOR HURRICANE PROTECTION
Lumber prices ride hurricane inland; Andrew drives plywood and framing wood rates through the roof.
FPL STORM TEAM PREPARED FOR '93 SEASON
WINDY TEACHER TAUGHT SOME TOUGH LESSONS
HURRICANE ANDREW RELIEF PROGRAM FOR HOME BUYERS AN OVERWHELMING SUCCESS, CHASE FEDERAL BANK, MIAMI, ANNOUNCES
FPL STORM TEAM PREPARED FOR '94 SEASON
The Home Depot Reiterates Its Pricing And Quantity Policies Following Hurricane Fran
NCMA to Congress: 'Katrina, Like Andrew, Puts Bull's-eye on Crucial Need for Stronger Buildings, Code Enforcement'.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters