Printer Friendly

HOME WEATHER-PROOFING HEATS UP WITH THE ARRIVAL OF WINTER

 HOME WEATHER-PROOFING HEATS UP WITH THE ARRIVAL OF WINTER
 FULLERTON, Calif., Oct. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- As the chills of winter begin to creep under doors and windows, now is the time to weather-proof your home, according to Jim Kessen, HomeBase building materials expert. Using affordable, uncomplicated do-it-yourself home improvement techniques, energy-conscious consumers can prepare themselves for winter storms, as well as winter savings.
 Hundreds of dollars leak out of the average home each year in the form of heat that escapes through doors, windows, roofs attics, walls, cracks, pipes and other exposed areas, explained Kessen. With the wide selection of weather-proofing products currently on the market -- including insulation and weather stripping -- homeowners now have the means to harness and decrease wasted energy.
 Insulation, an economic necessity for most owners of older homes, is categorized according to effectiveness, composition and construction. Effectiveness is measured in "R" (resistance) values established by the Department of Energy, which issues insulation recommendations for existing structures. Higher "R" values indicate higher insulation effectiveness. For example, in warm climates, attics heated by gas or oil have an R-19 recommendation; in the coldest climates, homes have an R-49 rating. If new insulation is added to existing insulation, the "R" values should be added together to determine overall heat retention.
 Insulation is available in a variety of constructions and is most commonly composed of mineral fiber, mineral granules, fiberglass, or reflective foil. Loose-fill insulation is used in walls and attic floor joints; blanket and batt insulation are designed for basements and areas with obstructions such as cross beams. Rigid board insulation, usually made of polystyrene or fiberboard coated with asphalt, can be used on a house's exterior or interior, including basement walls and floors. Foam insulation is popular for stopping air flow through cracks and around doors, windows and construction seams, whereas reflective foil is a typical solution for heat loss in hard-to-fit spaces.
 Specialty insulations are designed for simple application on pipes, ducts and water heaters. Fiberglass wrappings and slit foam strips enclose pipes and ducts to prevent condensation, dripping and freezing. For maintaining hot water temperature in water heaters, fiberglass and reflective foil are most effective.
 Weather stripping placed around doors, windows and other small openings can provide energy savings, as well as personal comfort. Created to stop drafts of cold air and prevent heat loss, weather stripping is available in a variety of materials to fit problem areas, such as garage doors and storm windows. Self-adhering tape, often made of foam or rubber, is especially easy for the novice do-it-yourselfer to use because it requires no nails or tools for installation. It is best suited for surrounding large spaces like doors and windows.
 Door-bottom shoes and sweeps are a combination of aluminum and vinyl that provide protection from drafts, water, noise and insects. Hair felt strips, which are nailed to frames or molding, are one of the most economical types of weather stripping, and clear polyethylene tape can be used to bridge window openings without spoiling their appearance. Other options include caulking cord, clear wood molding and nylon pile.
 Anticipating the arrival of the first winter storms, HomeBase home improvement warehouses are meeting the needs of conservation-minded consumers with a broad selection of quality, brand-names weather- proofing items. Carrying more than 30,000 home improvement products, HomeBase caters to both casual do-it-yourselfers and contractors with "certified expert" service and everyday low prices. HomeBase warehouses also provide customers with free "how to" booklets that detail more than 90 projects, including insulating attics and sidewalls, caulking and using solar film.
 Based in Fullerton, HomeBase Inc. is one of the nation's leading chains of home improvement warehouses. HomeBase currently operates 83 locations in 12 western and midwestern states and is a division of Natick, Mass.-based Waban Inc.
 -0- 10/6/92
 /NOTE: HomeBase experts are available for interview on home improvement topics/
 /CONTACT: Carol Elfstrom of HomeBase, 714-441-0171, ext. 519/ CO: HomeBase Inc. ST: California IN: REA SU:


SM -- NYHFNS3 -- 6872 10/06/92 06:56 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 6, 1992
Words:668
Previous Article:UNIQUE HEATER, ALWAYS COOL TO THE TOUCH, COMBINES SAFETY, COMFORT AND EFFECTIVENESS
Next Article:PROTECT YOUR HOME AGAINST WINTER CHILL: SAVE ENERGY, INCREASE COMFORT, ENHANCE SECURITY
Topics:


Related Articles
DUKE POWER HELPS CUSTOMERS COMBAT THE COLD
Duke Power Offers Tips To Prepare For Winter Weather
Helpers may be out in the cold.
Georgia Power Urges Customers to Conserve Energy.
Make sure energy bills are not too hot to handle.
Home Depot Launches 'E-plus' Campaign to Promote Home Energy Conservation; Forecasted Return to Cold Winter and Higher Heating Costs Spurs Consumer...
Personal Finance: Get ready for winter bills despite summer sunshine.
How Warm Front scheme helped Joyce.
Call to simplify benefits system.
Prepare your home for the big freeze.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters