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HIGH TECH CAMERAS AND LOUSY PICTURES; CAPTURE THE CHILD WITH 'CREATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR PHOTOGRAPHING CHILDREN,' TIPS ON TAKING TIMELESS PHOTOGRAPHS OF KIDS

 MINNEAPOLIS, April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- As the novelty of video cameras wear off, parents are increasingly returning to taking pictures as the mainstay for making archival treasures of their little ones -- and getting frustrated in the process.
 "New high tech cameras raise the expectation of getting good pictures," said Minneapolis child photography specialist Vik Orenstein. "Parents want photos which reflect how they see their children, but often all they get are flat, uninspiring pictures."
 Orenstein, whose nationally recognized custom photography business Kidshooters, has written a book specifically about how to capture the essence of the child.
 "Creative Techniques for Photographing Children" (Writer's Digest Books, $24.95) offers photographers at all levels of technical expertise hands-on advice for making "piano-ready" pictures -- the ones which are displayed and have lasting appeal. Orenstein offers dozens of basic and innovative approaches to coming away with great shots, both candids and portraits.
 "People want pictures which really capture the energy and special beauty they know in their child," said Orenstein.
 Ten Sure-Fire Techniques
 "Creative Techniques for Photographing Children" offers tips including how to photograph particular age groups and how to get great posed and non-posed shots. Sure-fire tips include:
 -- Fill up the picture frame with your child or children. People often comment about how great "tight" shots are, but rarely take them. The natural impulse is to show too much of the surroundings. Shots which show just faces and highlight expressions, are often the most compelling of all.
 -- Switch off the "horizontal hold" button. Many family photographers never take vertical pictures, yet faces and bodies have strong vertical lines. Think vertical, and your shots will "pop" more often.
 -- Shoot black and white photos at least twice a year. Black and white pictures have an ageless quality which highlight the subject in wonderful ways. Most photo finishing shops can handle black and white.
 -- Get down on the child's level. Photographing "eye-to-eye" makes for more intimate and powerful pictures. "Getting down" truly opens a door into the child's world. And don't be afraid of making an idiot of yourself.
 -- Shoot more and throw shots away. Simply said: its tough to get good shots. The more common picture taking is, the more natural and spontaneous your subjects will be. Once you choose the shots you like, ditch the rest. Having all the pictures around takes away from savoring the truly good ones.
 -- Let kids be kids, and never, never, never say "smile." It's nearly impossible for children to give a natural smile on command. Give them a reason to smile through situation or spontaneous action. When there's chaos, work with it to capture energy in your pictures. Loosen up! If you're not enjoying the situation, you can be sure that sentiment will be reflected in the pictures.
 -- Shoot in open shade and use the fill flash. The fill flash is the most underutilized feature of the most basic cameras. Shoot in shade and use the flash in daylight to really highlight facial features.
 -- Shoot kids looking into the camera and more often -- even when crying. The eyes have it when it comes to revealing expression and emotion. Keep the eyes in the upper third of the frame. Catching a range of feelings is to capture childhood.
 -- Ask the child for suggestions. Let the kids take the lead in finding imaginative places for picture taking -- up in a tree, inside a playhouse, running through a field -- these are the places children call their own.
 -- Go to the child, don't make the child come to you. Once you cross the line from observer to director, the game is over. Your best bet is to be in the scene, talking, chatting, responding while at the same time taking pictures. When the camera is an extension of your own observations, you'll walk away with more satisfying photos.
 "Creative Techniques for Photographing Children" includes over 100 joy-filled examples of children's photographs which demonstrate the many techniques discussed. It also has helpful technical advice on equipment, film, lighting and exposure, darkroom techniques, retouching, and displaying the final picture.
 Orenstein's Minneapolis business, Kidshooters, specializes in hand- colored black and white photographs, created to be displayed as art portraits in her customers' homes.
 "There are few things in this world more gratifying than getting a great picture of a child," said Orenstein.
 "Creative Techniques for Photographing Children" is available at bookstores. To order direct, send $24.95 plus $3 to: Writer's Digest Books, 1507 Dana Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45207. Visa and MasterCard orders may be placed by calling 800-289-0963.
 -0- 4/27/93
 /CONTACT: Vik Orenstein of Kidshooters, 612-371-0908; or Josh Kohnstamm of Kohnstamm Communications, 612-228-9141, for Kidshooters/


CO: Kidshooters ST: Minnesota IN: SU: PDT

SM -- NYPFNS2 -- 1082 04/27/93 06:47 EDT
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Date:Apr 27, 1993
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