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HARRIS PUBLISHING STUDY NAMES BEST AND WORST MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT SECTORS IN AMERICA

 HARRIS PUBLISHING STUDY NAMES BEST AND WORST
 MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT SECTORS IN AMERICA


U.S. Electronics Industry Employment Up, Automotive and Tobacco Down
 TWINSBURG, Ohio, Sept. 1 /PRNewswire/ -- If you're looking for a job in manufacturing, your best bet for overall industry growth and stability are still in the companies producing electronic and electrical equipment, along with companies making fabricated metal products. Food products manufacturers are another major group of companies with employment on the rise. On the down side, employment in the tobacco and transportation industries have declined sharply between 1988 and 1992.
 That's according to the latest statistical study from Harris Publishing Company of Twinsburg, Ohio, the leading compiler/publisher and provider of manufacturers directories and directories on disc for the United States and Canada. The 5-year study, based on a comparison of employment in manufacturing establishments with 100 or more employees was made during compilation of the publishers newest directory, the "1993 Harris Manufacturers Directory--National Edition." The directory profiles nearly 40,000 top companies in this growth area.
 "In spite of the recession, specific growth areas in the electronics industry such as industrial controls and computers continue to out perform other manufacturing sectors," said Robert A. Harris, president of Harris Publishing Company. "Our research shows an 18.3 percent gain in employment from 1,719,281 in 1988 to 2,033,075 in 1992 among electronics manufacturers with 100 or more employees."
 "By the year 2000 the American economy will have generated 21 million new jobs," Harris continued. "That's according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Despite claims of America's declining manufacturing base, a substantial number of those new jobs will be in manufacturing. And the bulk of those employed in these new jobs in manufacturing will be in companies with over 100 employees. At the present time, 71 percent of the manufacturing work force in the U.S. is employed by these larger companies."
 The second fastest growing industrial sector for larger manufacturers has been in fabricated metal products with a 13.7 percent increase in manufacturing employment from 892,268 employees in 1988 to 1,014,682 employees in 1992. This sector covers everything from metal cans to hand tools to pipes and valves. Manufacturing employment growth areas included producers of large fabricated steel structures, metal forgings and stampings.
 Food products manufacturers rank third in growth among the nation's employers with a 12.3 percent rise in employment in the past five years, from 1,161,448 in 1988 to 1,304,705 in 1992. The study shows this growth is especially true in companies that package poultry and seafood. Also, it appears that health-conscious consumers are turning away from packaged beef, which has shown a steady decline over the same five year period. In addition, canned foods, candy and the beverage industries have all shown employment increases. Harris suggests the reason for this move toward convenience foods may be found in the changing needs of the American family, with an ever-increasing trend toward two wage earner households and single-person households.
 Other sectors that showed a rise in manufacturing employment included the stone, clay and glass products industry with an 8.1 percent increase from the 301,246 in 1988 up to 325,568 in 1992. Paper products manufacturing employment rose 6.1 percent from 517,401 to 549,168 while industrial machinery increased 5.9 percent from 1,035,062 to 1,096,010. Rubber and plastic products manufacturing employment grew 4.5 percent from 588,778 to 615,446. Leather products employment was close behind with a 4.0 percent increase from 99,652 in 1988 to 103,591 in 1992. Chemicals manufacturing employment grew 1.8 percent from 790,119 to 804,006 in the same five year period. Within the primary metals industries employment among larger firms squeezed out a minor .9 percent increase.
 "Manufacturing is a reflection of America," Harris said. "That's what makes an annually up-dated manufacturers directory so vital to marketers and researchers. It's a valuable tool when you're trying to understand or target a market. We happen to be one of the few publishers in the industry to telephone verify each company we profile. That's vital, in my opinion, if you're going to provide accurate, in- depth company information. It's the only way to keep up with the massive changes in manufacturing."
 The kind of change Harris refers to is evident in the statistics on manufacturing employment in the tobacco industry. In 1988 there were 55,613 people employed in the manufacture of tobacco products. Today that number has dropped to 36,447, a 34.5 percent decrease. The same is true of the depressed transportation equipment industry with a 20.1 percent decline in employment from 1,790,884 in 1988 down to 1,431,170 in 1992.
 Not only has there been a decline among automobile manufacturers, but also among aircraft and missile manufacturers, primarily due to defense cuts. Other manufacturing sectors with drops in employment included textile mill products with a 10.8 percent decrease, wood products manufacturing employment with a 7.8 percent drop, furniture and fixtures with a 4.1 percent decline, and the manufacture of apparel and related products with a 1.2 percent loss of employment.
 For more information on Harris directories and directories on disc call 800-888-5900.
 Changes in Manufacturing Employment
 in Industry
 INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT Percent
 1988 1992 Change
 Electronic & Electric Equipment 1,719,281 2,033,075 18.3
 Fabricated Metal Products 892,268 1,014,682 13.7
 Food Products 1,161,448 1,304,705 12.3
 Stone, Clay and Glass Products 301,246 325,568 8.1
 Paper Products 517,401 549,168 6.1
 Industrial Machinery 1,035,062 1,096,010 5.9
 Rubber and Plastic Products 588,778 615,446 4.5
 Leather Products 99,652 103,591 4.0
 Chemicals 790,119 804,006 1.8
 Primary Metal Industries 615,955 621,528 .9
 Apparel and Related Products 710,600 702,358 (1.2)
 Furniture and Fixtures 351,333 336,935 (4.1)
 Wood Products (Excl. Furniture) 320,887 295,850 (7.8)
 Textile Mill Products 594,090 530,140 (10.8)
 Transportation Equipment 1,790,884 1,431,170 (20.1)
 Tobacco Products 55,613 36,447 (34.5)
 -0- 9/1/92
 /CONTACT: Barbara Brouse of Harris Publishing Group, 216-425-9000, or 800-888-5900; or by FAX 216-425-7150, or 800-643-5997/ CO: Harris Publishing Company ST: Ohio IN: PUB SU:


KK -- CL002 -- 5246 09/01/92 07:59 EDT
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