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HANFORD DEMONSTRATES PROOF OF 'SAVING THROUGH SHARING'

 HANFORD DEMONSTRATES PROOF OF 'SAVING THROUGH SHARING'
 RICHLAND, Wash., May 6 /PRNewswire/ -- An innovative new program called Saving through Sharing, initiated by Westinghouse, is saving taxpayers' money at a number of government sites, and Westinghouse Hanford Co. is already a $3 million contributor to its success, the company said today.
 Recent achievements involve close teaming between employees at two or more U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, working on similar project needs instead of each program spending time and money duplicating each other's efforts. Four examples involving Hanford are already credited with $3.3 million savings.
 The concept is simple. Dollar savings can be achieved by sharing information and expertise to solve problems among the six Department of Energy facilities which Westinghouse manages. (See note below).
 "Not only does this save money by reducing duplication of effort in problem solving, but the collective thinking brings better solutions," said Mike Korenko, vice president of the Engineered Applications Division and coordinator of the company-wide effort.
 Key to the program are useful suggestions for possible team efforts, offered by various program experts at the government-owned sites managed by the Westinghouse subsidiaries. Beginning in 1990, representative committees focused on employee development and training opportunities, health and safety issues, environmental remediation and waste management, Korenko said.
 Following are examples of Westinghouse Hanford's suggestions and payoffs already totalling more than $3 million:
 RADIATION PROTECTION MANUAL: To better protect its own employees, Westinghouse Hanford people developed a new Radiation Health Protection manual. They looked at what was available throughout the nuclear industry, chose the best and improved on that, creating a uniform manual to meet new DOE health protection policies and reduce radiation exposure. Then, in essence, representatives of Hanford and other sites applied that text and expertise to all sites.
 That saved at least $1.5 million because employees elsewhere didn't need to develop separate documents for each facility. DOE has since made use of the manual in developing requirements for the entire DOE system.
 RIGGING INSPECTIONS: Previously, Westinghouse Hanford inspected hoist and rigging equipment using extremely stringent standards in excess of what was actually required for the equipment involved. Company personnel evaluated the requirements to ensure employee safety and applied more cost-effective inspection criteria, more similar to those used in private industry.
 This saves nearly $600,000 annually at Hanford alone, with greater savings possible as other sites adopt Hanford's changes.
 CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS: Westinghouse Hanford was a strong participant in developing a unique Conduct of Operations manual as an upgraded management tool for use at all Westinghouse-managed nuclear and industrial sites. Because the committee shared ideas and programs, it avoided needless duplication of effort. That produced a better manual at much less cost. Moreover, DOE endorsed it, and it's now a vital training document.
 RESEARCH RESULTS: Hanford saved over $1.2 million by using research findings obtained from the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Both sites are involved in test programs for effluent treatment. By utilizing the technology and lessons learned at Savannah River, S.C., Hanford reduced the scope of its research because it did not have to replicate that work.
 Jim Gallagher, general manager of the Westinghouse Government Operations Business Unit, said the corporation's management of multiple DOE sites helps meet tough DOE demands. It benefits taxpayers too.
 "Multiple site management lets DOE harness our combined management and technological expertise. All six sites can pull together to solve common site challenges," Gallagher pointed out.
 Leo Duffy, director of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management at DOE headquarters, has urged all contractors to conduct their operations for DOE "better, safer, faster and cheaper." And, Gallagher said, "To succeed, we need more than ever to move ideas, solutions, programs and practices of excellence across site boundaries."
 NOTE: Westinghouse corporate subsidiaries manage DOE facilities and programs at Savannah River, S.C.; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Carlsbad, N.M.; Buffalo, N.Y., and Fernald, Ohio, as well as the Hanford site near Richland, Wash.
 -0- 5/6/92
 /CONTACT: Dick Stone of Westinghouse Hanford, 509-376-8719/ CO: Westinghouse Hanford ST: Washington IN: OIL SU:


LM-JH -- SE009 -- 7170 05/06/92 14:24 EDT
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Date:May 6, 1992
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