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Gothic Canada; reading the spectre of a national literature.



0888644418

Gothic Canada; reading the spectre of a national literature.

Edwards, Justin D.

The U. of Alberta Press

2005

194 pages

$34.95

Paperback

PR9185

What happens when a town, a region, or a country learns the truth about itself? Edwards (English, U. of Copenhagen) calls upon his years of reflection as a Canadian expatriate Expatriate

An employee who is a U.S. citizen living and working in a foreign country.
 upon the spectral nature of Canadian identity Canadian identity refers to the set of characteristics and symbols that many Canadians regard as expressing their unique place and role in the world.

Primary influences on the "Canadian identity" are the existence of many well-established First Nations and the arrival,
 as he explores the haunted places of its literature. He finds the ghosts of forgotten history dancing with the more specific specters of the excesses of colonialism and the wilderness, locating such gothic results as the works of such as John Richardson The name John Richardson can refer to:
  • John Richardson (football player)), Miami Dolphins
  • Sir John Richardson (naturalist) (1787-1865), Arctic explorer and naturalist
  • John Richardson (author) (1796–1852), Canadian novelist
  • John Richardson (actor) (b.
, Sinclair Ross James Sinclair Ross (January 22, 1908 - February 29, 1996) was a Canadian banker and author, best known for his fiction about life in the Canadian prairies.

Ross was born on a homestead near Shellbrook, Saskatchewan.
 and F.P. Grove, and Margaret Atwood, along with a range of filmmakers. He finds dark journeys, the abyss, haunted spaces and selves, dark cities, suppressed transgressions, wakeful dead, monsters, and a decidedly gothic idea of what constitutes the body politic BODY POLITIC, government, corporations. When applied to the government this phrase signifies the state.
     2. As to the persons who compose the body politic, they take collectively the name, of people, or nation; and individually they are citizens, when considered
. The result is like exploring a forgotten graveyard that has recently risen through a cornfield otherwise shining under a broad sky. Distributed by the Michigan State U. Press.

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Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Feb 1, 2007
Words:182
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