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Further adventures with rhubarb ... kumquat, cream.

Flaky pastry encases the filling for these two rhubarb pies. Choose from an open-faced cream pie or a double-crusted spiced fruit pie. See page 70 for others.
Rhubarb Cream Pie
 Pastry for a single-crust 9-inch pie
 (see far right)
 2 cups 1/2-inch pieces rhubarb
 3 large eggs, separated
 1/2 cup half-and-half (light cream) or
 milk
 1 cup sugar
 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
 teaspoon cream of tartar
 1/2 teaspoon vanilla


On a lightly floured board, roll pastry into a 12-inch-diameter round; ease into a 9-inch pie pan. Fold edges under; flute rim decoratively. Put rhubarb in pastry. In a bowl, beat yolks, cream, 2/3 cup sugar, and flour until smooth; pour over rhubarb. Bake in a 375[deg.] oven on lowest rack until pastry is golden brown and custard appears set in center when pie is jiggled, 40 to 45 minutes. If rim begins to darken excessively, drape with strips of foil. In a large bowl, beat whites and cream of tartar at high speed with an electric mixer until frothy. Gradually whip in remaining 1/2 cup sugar and vanilla, beating until whites hold stiff, glossy peaks. Pile meringue onto hot filling. With a spatula, swirl meringue over filling and up against rim of pastry, Bake in a 400[deg.] oven until meringue is tinged with brown, 3 to 5 minutes (if you are concerned about undercooked eggs, continue to bake until temperature in center of meringue is 160[deg.], about 7 minutes). Serve warm or at room temperature. If made ahead, let cool, then cover without touching meringue and chill up until next day. Cut into wedges. Serves 8 or 9. Janet Winner, Corvallis, Ore. Per serving:406 cal.; 6.l g protein; 21 g fat; 49 g carbo.; 148 mg sodium; 76 mg chol.
Spiced Rhubarb-Kumquat Pie
 1 cup sugar
 1/4 cup quick-cooking tapioca
 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
 1/2 teaspoon each ground cinnamon
 and ground coriander
 4 cups 1/2-inch pieces rhubarb
 1/2 cup kumquats, seeded and cut into
 quarters
 2 tablespoons thawed frozen orange
 juice concentrate
 Pastry for a double-crust 9-inch pie
 (see far right)


In a large bowl, stir together sugar, tapioca, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, and coriander. Add rhubarb, kumquats, and orange juice concentrate; mix well. Let stand at least 15 minutes or up to 1 hour to soften tapioca; stir gently several times. On a lightly floured board, roll half of pastry into a 12-inch-diameter round; ease into a 9-inch pie pan. Fill with rhubarb mixture. On a floured board, roll remaining pastry into a 10-inch square. With a pastry wheel or knife, cut into 8 equal strips. Arrange pastry strips on top of pie in lattice pattern; trim off strips as they lap over the rim. Fold bottom crust over lattice, flush with pan rim, and flute. to seal. Set pie in a foil-lined 10- by 15-inch pan (pie bubbles as it cooks). Bake in a 400[deg.] oven on the lowest rack until pastry is golden brown and filling is bubbly, 50 to 55 minutes. If rim begins to darken excessively, drape with Strips of foil. Serve warm or at room temperature. If made ahead, cool, cover loosely, and store at room temperature up until next day. Cut into wedges. Serves 8 or 9.-Alan L. Fahrenbruch, Redwood City, Calif. Per serving: 658 cal.; 7.1 g protein; 35 g fat,- 80 g carbo.; 248 mg sodium; 0 mg chol. Pastry Pastry for a double-crust 9-inch pie. In a bowl, combine 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour and 1/2 teaspoon salt. With a pastry blender or your fingers, cut or rub 3/4 cup solid vegetable shortening, butter, or margarine until fine crumbs form. Sprinkle 5 to 7 tablespoons cold water over crumbs. Stir with a fork until dough holds together. Divide dough in half and pat each portion into a flat, smooth round. Use as specified in recipes; if made ahead, seal dough in plastic wrap and chill up to 3 days. Pastry for a single-crust 9-inch pie. Follow preceding recipe, using 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour; 1/4 teaspoon salt; 6 tablespoons solid vegetable shortening, butter, or margarine; and 2 to 3 tablespoons cold water.
COPYRIGHT 1991 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1991 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Title Annotation:recipes
Publication:Sunset
Date:Feb 1, 1991
Words:710
Previous Article:Return of the forgotten vegetables.
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