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Fortune Ranks the 50 Most Powerful Women in American Business.

List Reveals a Power Surge Among Women

Who Aren't in Traditional Corporate Positions

NEW YORK, Sept. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Carly Fiorina, the group president of Lucent Technologies' Global Service Provider Business, leads FORTUNE's inaugural list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in American Business. Overseeing the most successful IPO in U.S. history, and heading a division that will generate some $19 billion in revenues this year, Fiorina captured the top slot because of her enormous clout in one of the hottest companies in the most important industry in American business -- telecommunications. In the October 12 issue of FORTUNE, senior writer Patricia Sellers identifies today's most influential female power brokers and the challenges that face them as women in business.

Rounding out the top five positions on the list are Oprah Winfrey (#2), Chairman and CEO, Harpo Entertainment Group; Heidi Miller (#3), Chief Financial Officer, Travelers Group; Shelly Lazarus (#4), Chairman and CEO, Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide; and Sherry Lansing (#5), Chairman, Motion Picture Group, Paramount Pictures. High profile businesswomen, including Martha Stewart (#11), Rainwater president Darla Moore (#19) and Warnaco CEO Linda Wachner (#34) made the list, while some lesser known names, such as Merck CFO Judy Lewent (#13) and Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom partner Sheila Birnbaum (#21), received high rankings.

In establishing criteria by which to measure power, FORTUNE took into consideration revenues and profits controlled, influence inside the company, the importance of the business in the global economy and its impact on American culture. Politics and the nonprofit sector were excluded from consideration.

There is a difference of opinion among the top 50 powerful women about what power means. "Power is the privilege to influence," says Avon president Andrea Jung (#8). "It's an unbelievable responsibility to influence decisions... and most important to me, people's careers and livelihoods."

"I get no thrill out of being powerful," says Ogilvy & Mather CFO Shelly Lazarus while Enron vice chairman Rebecca Mark (#14) says that she "was born comfortable with power." According to FORTUNE's Sellers, for women, much more than for men, power is about choices and balance. For some of those women, writes Sellers, finding balance comes down to trading professional power for peace of mind.

Many women on the list are former top-ranked executives who left their positions to pursue entrepreneurial urges. "Now they're flying solo," reports Sellers. "And they are creating a sort of parallel universe of power outside the traditional corporate orbit." Geraldine Laybourne (#20) is one such woman. Having built Nickelodeon and running Disney's cable TV division, Laybourne recently founded her own company to provide programming for women for television and the Internet. "Real power is creating stuff," says Laybourne.

A look at the industry breakdown of FORTUNE's powerful women shows that the majority work in advertising, media and entertainment, and publishing. Finance and technology are well represented, but there is a lack of top women at blue-chip firms like IBM, Dell, Compaq and Intel. Only three of the women on the list are in retail.

Similarities among the group abound. All the women on the list avoided the traditional "female" career paths in working their way up the corporate ladder. "Don't think of yourself as a woman in business," advises Carly Fiorina. Most of the women are the eldest of their siblings and grew up in the Northeast. Nearly 70% attended coed college, but only seven of the women were in sororities. Only 16 of the 50 play golf, and 10 were born under Leo, the sign of born leaders.

The October 12 issue of FORTUNE is available on newsstands beginning September 28. For more information or to schedule an interview with a FORTUNE writer or editor, contact Susan Brown at 212-522-4071. "The 50 Most Powerful Women in American Business" and other FORTUNE stories are available at www.fortune.com.

FORTUNE'S 50 MOST POWERFUL WOMEN IN AMERICAN BUSINESS

October 12, 1998
 RANK NAME TITLE COMPANY

 1 CARLY FIORINA Group President, Lucent Technologies
 Global Service
 Provider Business
 2 OPRAH WINFREY Chairman and CEO Harpo Entertainment


Group
 3 HEIDI MILLER CFO Travelers Group
 4 SHELLY LAZARUS Chairman and CEO Ogilvy & Mather


Worldwide
 5 SHERRY LANSING Chairman, Motion Picture
 Group Paramount Pictures
 6 JILL BARAD Chairman and CEO Mattel
 7 MARILYN CARLSON CEO, President,
 NELSON and Vice Chairman Carlson Cos.
 8 ANDREA JUNG President and C00 Avon Products
 9 ABBY JOSEPH Co-chair, Goldman Sachs
 COHEN Investment Policy
 Committee
 10 MARJORIE SCARDINO CEO Pearson PLC
 11 MARTHA STEWART Chairman and CEO Martha Stewart


Living Omnimedia

12 PAT RUSSO Executive VP, Lucent Technologies

Corporate Strategy and
 Operations
 13 JUDY LEWENT Senior Vice President Merck
 and CFO
 14 REBECCA MARK Vice Chairman Enron
 15 LOIS JULIBER EVP and COO,
 Developed Markets Colgate-Palmolive
 16 KAREN KATEN President,


U.S. Pharmaceuticals Group Pfizer
 17 ANN MOORE President People magazine
 18 JUDY MCGRATH President MTV and M2
 19 DARLA MOORE President Rainwater Inc.
 20 GERALDINE Chairman and CEO Oxygen Media
 LAYBOURNE
 21 SHELIA BIRNBAUM Partner Skadden Arps Slate


Meagher & Flom

22 CAROLYN TICKNOR General Manager, Hewlett-Packard
 LaserJet Solutions Grp.
 23 PATTI MANUEL President and COO,
 Long-Distance Division Sprint
 24 ANN WINBLAD Partner Hummer Winblad


Venture Partners
 25 CATHLEEN BLACK President Hearst Magazines
 26 ORIT GADIESH Chairman Bain & Co.
 27 CLAIRE FARLEY VP and President, Texaco


North American Production
 28 JAMIE GORELICK Vice Chairman Fannie Mae
 29 ABIGAIL JOHNSON Senior VP, Equity Division Fidelity Investments
 30 ANN FUDGE Executive VP, Kraft


Coffee and Cereals Division

31 DEBORAH WILLINGHAM Vice President, Microsoft
 Enterprise Customer Unit
 32 JEANNE JACKSON CEO Banana Republic
 33 MARTHA INGRAM Chairman Ingram Industries
 34 LINDA WACHNER Chairman and CEO Warnaco
 35 LUCY FISHER Vice Chairman Columbia Tri-Star


Motion Pictures (Sony)
 36 CAROL BARTZ Chairman and CEO Autodesk
 37 KATHERINE DWYER President, Consumer Revlon
 Products USA
 38 PATRICIA FILI- President ABC Television Network
 KRUSHEL
 39 ESTHER DYSON CEO EDventure Holdings
 40 BRIDGET MACASKILL President and CEO Oppenheimer Funds
 41 JUDITH ESTRIN Senior VP and Cisco Systems


Chief Technology Officer
 42 JEANNINE RIVET EVP, Health Plan Business United Healthcare
 43 LINDA SRERE President and CEO Young & Rubicam, NY
 44 BRENDA BARNES Director
 45 MARION SANDLER Co-Chairman and co-CEO Golden West Financial
 46 ANTHEA DISNEY Chairman and CEO News America


Publishing Group

47 ANNE SWEENEY President Disney/ABC Cable
 Networks
 48 SYLVIA RHONE Chairman Elektra Entertainment


Group

49 TERESA BECK President American Stores

50 ELLEN MARRAM Former CEO Tropicana
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No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1998 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 21, 1998
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