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Followers of alien teachings to heal world from peak.

Byline: CLARE HUTCHINSON

CLIMB South Wales' highest peak next Sunday and you will be greeted with a sight that is out of this world.

On top of Pen-y-Fan in the Brecon Beacons you will find anorak-wearing devotees of a UFO religion attempting to use the mountain's cosmic energy to heal the world.

Members of the Aetherius Society claim they are following the teachings of friendly aliens who want them to make the world a better place.

They believe: Most of the planets in our solar system, including the sun, are inhabited by aliens more advanced than us; Jesus was a cosmic master from Venus who was sent to Earth, as were Buddha and Krishna; UFO sightings are in fact friendly aliens visiting our planet.

London taxi driver and former wartime fireman George King set up the Aetherius Society in 1955 after being told by a disembodied voice: "Prepare yourself! You are to become the voice of Interplanetary Parliament".

Alone in his London flat, the startled yoga enthusiast then claimed to receive a visit a few days later from a world-renowned yoga master who at the time was in India. He claimed the master had entered and left through a locked door.

Following further commands from the alien politician, code-named Aetherius, he set up the religion in the UK and America, became a doctor of divinity and gathered up to 10,000 followers worldwide.

One of the mysterious "cosmic transmissions", from his alien master told him to "charge" 19 mountains in the world with cosmic energy.

According to the religion Pen-y-Fan is one of these 19 holy mountains, along with Mt Kilimanjaro in Tanzania and Mt Baldy in California.

So in the 1960s, Dr King dutifully trudged up Pen-y-Fan, and used the palms of his hands to "charge" the mountain with what he said was energy from deep space.

And almost 50 years on, his followers will gather on the mountain next Sunday and attempt to send some of its stored energy out into the world.

Society member Dr Dee Bhakta, who was brought up with the religion, explained: "You don't necessarily have to be a follower to join in, everybody is welcome.

"We stand in a circle with our palms facing outwards and read out prayers and a group stand behind us who chant a mantra.

"You use your body as a charge and you can feel the energy coming through the palms of your hands. It's like a heat.

"You are party to a higher force, which we call God, and it encourages us to become better human beings and heal the world.

"Normally we try to heal in a general sense but if, for example, there has been a tsunami we will try to direct the healing energy towards that."

Over 30 years, Dr King claimed to have received more than 600 messages from outer space as Earth's designated Primary Terrestrial Mental Channel.

Since his death in 1997, the members of the society claim they have lost the direct link to their alien masters, so instead, they follow the instructions left behind by Dr King.

"As far as I'm concerned he is the one person who received communications," said 41-year-old Dr Bhakta, who works at a London university lecturing in nutrition.

"He was the one person who had a link with people from outer space and now he is no longer with us. But he has left a lot of things which are his legacy.

She added: "People have believed mountains to be special for thousands of years and we are just following on from that.

"I think it is a fantastic experience to pray outside in the open with the sun shining and we don't do anyone any harm.

"In fact, people are very open to it and a lot of people will stop to watch. We have never been laughed at or treated rudely when we are up there."

ON ANOTHER PLANET THE Aetherius Society is the oldest of the UFO religions, but is by no means the most unusual group to believe in extra terrestrials: Heaven's Gate: The cult hit the headlines in March 1997, when 39 members committed mass suicide. Afterwards it was reported the group had taken their own lives so they could be transported to a UFO hidden behind Comet Hale-Bopp.

Nation of Islam: Founded in Detroit in 1930, the religion aimed to improve the lives of black people in America. One of their more bizarre beliefs is that a UFO described in the Bible will destroy the Earth on judgement day.

Ralism: The largest UFOlogy in the world was founded 20 years after George King became the "voice of Interplanetary Parliament". Members believe super-intelligent aliens genetically designed humans.

Industrial Church of the New World Comforter: The church was founded in 1973 by a Californian sign painter who claimed he was contacted telepathically by a UFO. Allen Michael is recognised by members today as a galactic channel of the "Comforter Spirit of Truth".

CAPTION(S):

COSMIC: Members of the Aetherius Society on a previous trip to Pen-y-Fan in the Brecon Beacons PEAK TRANSMISSION: Pen-y-Fan and the surrounding area, where Aetherius Society members plan to gather
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Publication:Wales On Sunday (Cardiff, Wales)
Geographic Code:4EUUK
Date:Aug 16, 2009
Words:863
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