Printer Friendly

Fitness; Diagnosis.

You should discuss your fitness level with a health care professional before you try to improve it on your own, especially if you haven't been active in awhile, have any chronic health conditions or are over 50.

During a fitness assessment, your health care professional should ask you about chest pain, faintness or dizziness, bone or joint pain, and about any medications you're taking. The health care professional should check the health of your heart and joints, measure your blood pressure and weight, and determine if you have a hernia or diabetes. These issues may affect how vigorously you may exercise or the types of exercise you can safely do. If you have heart disease or any risk factors for heart disease, you may need to undergo an electrocardiogram while exercising, commonly called a stress test. During this test, you walk on a treadmill while the health care professional monitors your heart and blood pressure.

Sometimes, your health care professional is the one suggesting a fitness program. This is a good option if you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol, are overweight, have a high percentage of body fat, or are losing bone density (a precursor to osteoporosis).

Your health care professional also may recommend a fitness regime if you have or are at risk of developing one of a variety of chronic conditions, such as diabetes.

For example, strong muscles can help those with osteoarthritis protect their joints and bones by improving stability and absorbing shock. Regular exercise also helps women with chronic lung disease improve their endurance and reduce shortness of breath. It is also an important part of controlling blood sugar, strengthening the bones of women with osteoporosis and protecting younger women's bones from becoming thin and fragile. It may even increase life expectancy for women with heart disease.

Your health care professional can give you advice about a program suited to your health needs and fitness goals. He or she also may refer you to a fitness professional or a hospital-based fitness class to provide guidance as you begin.

References

"Physical activity." HealthierUS.gov. 2007. http://www.healthierus.gov. Accessed October 2007.

"Physical activity." Womenshealth.gov. January 2005. (Link from the HealthierUs.gov site). http://www.womenshealth.gov/. Accessed October 2007.

"Fitness Fundamentals: Guidelines for Personal Exercise Programs." 2007. http://www.fitness.gov. Accessed October 2007.

"U.S. Physical Activities Statistics." The Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated May 2007. http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov. Accessed October 2007.

Jakicic JM, et al. "Effect of Exercise Duration and Intensity on Weight Loss in Overweight, Sedentary Women" JAMA. 2003;290: 1323-1330. http://jama.ama-assn.org. Accessed September 2003.

"What are some tips for being more active?" National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated Feb. 2003. http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed August 2003.

Yoke M. "A Guide to Personal Fitness Training." Sherman Oaks. Calif: Aerobics and Fitness Association of America; 1997. http://www.afaa.com. Accessed August 2003.

Jordan P. "Fitness: Theory and Practice." Sherman Oaks. Calif: Aerobics and Fitness Association of America and Stoughton. Mass: Reebok University Press; 2nd ed. 1995. http://www.afaa.com. Accessed August 2003.

"Healthy eating tips." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov. Updated April 2003. Accessed Aug. 2003.

"Physical activity and good nutrition." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov. Reviewed May 2003. Accessed August 2003.

"Exercise: Feeling fit for life." National Institute on Aging. http://www.niapublications.org. 2000. Accessed August 2003.

Cahill S. "Exercise." National Institute on Aging. http://www.niapublications.org. June 2001. Accessed Aug. 2003.

"Physical Activity: AHA scientific position." American Heart Association. 2007. http://www.americanheart.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Chapter 4: Physical Activity." Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, U.S. Department of Agriculture. http://www.health.gov. Accessed February 2007.

"Target Heart Rates." American Heart Association. 2007. Accessed February 2007.

"Strength Training: Get stronger, leaner, and healthier." The Mayo Clinic. July 2006. http://www.mayoclinic.com. Accessed February 2007.

"Aerobics & Your Feet" American Podiatric Medical Association 2007. http://www.apma.org. Accessed February 2007.

"ACE Yoga Study." The American Council on Exercise. 2007. http://www.acefitness.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Strength Training 101." The American Council on Exercise. 2007. http://www.acefitness.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Pilates Primer" The American Council on Exercise. 2007. http://www.acefitness.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Types of Exercise." American Diabetes Association. 2007. http://www.diabetes.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Getting Started." American Diabetes Association. 2007. http://www.diabetes.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Physical Activity Among Adults: United States, 2000 and 2005." The National Center for Health Statistics. 2007. http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed February 2007.

"Physical inactivity and your heart." American Heart Association. 2007. www.americanheart.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Flexible benefits." The American Council on Exercise. 2007. http://www.acefitness.org. Accessed February 2007.

"Exercise During Pregnancy." Harvard University Health Services. 2003. http://huhs.harvard.edu. Accessed February 2007.

"Risk Factors." The University of Virginia Health System. 2007. http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu. Accessed February 2007.

Keywords: fitness, exercise, blood pressure, women
COPYRIGHT 2007 National Women's Health Resource Center
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2007 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:NWHRC Health Center - Fitness
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jun 12, 2007
Words:851
Previous Article:Fitness; Facts to Know.
Next Article:Fitness; Prevention.
Topics:


Related Articles
VITAL HEART SYSTEMS ANNOUNCES RAPID ACCEPTANCE OF ITS VITAL HEART CHECKPOINT CENTERS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Get fit for Summer.
OH NO! EILEEN FAILS THE DAZ TEST.
Fitness; Diagnosis.
Rave Reviews Abound for Life Fitness' New Home Treadmills.
Cricket: Selectors repeat error of last Ashes tour.
LAMBERT'S CLOSER TO GROIN OK.
Less weight gain seen with modern chemo regimens: the classical regimen is notorious for causing nausea; many women self-medicate against nausea by...
Nurse rapped for drug use; SHE TREATED CHILD WITHOUT PERMISSION.
Oakley Creates Special Edition Sunglasses to Support ALS Research.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters