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Finzi: Dies Natalis; Prelude for Strings; Farewell to Arms; etc, Gilchrist/ BSO/ Hill

Dies Natalis Dies natalis (Day of Birth) is a 1939 composition by Gerald Finzi. In it, Finzi sets to music the words of the poet, Thomas Traherne. It is one of Finzi's best-known and most popular works. , settings of poems by Thomas Traherne Thomas Traherne, MA (1636 or 1637, Hereford, England - ca. September 27, 1674, Teddington) was an English poet and religious writer. Life
He was born in Ledbury, son of a shoemaker.
, is Gerald Finzi's best known and arguably greatest work. Its addition to the survey of Finzi's music that Naxos has compiled over the past few years confirms the cycle as one of the most important things that the label has done. Competition on disc, for this solo cantata cantata (kəntä`tə) [Ital.,=sung], composite musical form similar to a short unacted opera or brief oratorio, developed in Italy in the baroque period. , is strong. But James Gilchrist's performance, if not quite as lyrically unbuttoned as the classic EMI (ElectroMagnetic Interference) An electrical disturbance in a system due to natural phenomena, low-frequency waves from electromechanical devices or high-frequency waves (RFI) from chips and other electronic devices. Allowable limits are governed by the FCC.  recording by Wilfred Brown with the composer's son conducting, is perfectly judged, while David Hill's moulding of the opening string Intrada sets the tone exactly. The rest of the disc is made up of odds and ends. The Prelude for string orchestra is all that survives of Finzi's plan to compose a chamber symphony, while The Fall of the Leaf was to be the central panel of an orchestral triptych. Farewell to Arms, a Farewell to Arms, A

novel of lovers who flee from war’s horrors. [Am. Lit.: A Farewell to Arms]

See : Antimilitarism
 pair of settings of 17th-century poems, neatly complements the Traherne, and Gilchrist treats them with as much care.
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Author:guardian.co.uk
Publication:guardian.co.uk
Date:Apr 25, 2008
Words:164
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