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Fahrenheit 451.

Fahrenheit 451 (Universal Pictures, 1966). The title of this Francois Truffaut and Ray Bradbury film refers to the temperature at which paper ignites, and in this dystopian tale of a fascist society where no one thinks for themselves, firemen like Guy Montag (Oskar Werner) burn books to protect a TV-watching citizenry from disturbing ideas.

But when a woman (Julie Christie) who doesn't spend her days glued to the shopping channel convinces a curious Montag to sample the dangerous pleasures of literature and discover why so many rebels are willing to unplug their state-run TVs, new worlds begin to open, and the hunter soon finds himself among the hunted.

***1/2
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Title Annotation:McCormick's Quick Takes On Technology Thrillers
Publication:U.S. Catholic
Article Type:Movie Review
Date:Oct 1, 2003
Words:110
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AUTHOR OF '451' COMING TO TOWN PART OF 'THE BIG READ,' BRADBURY TALKS SUNDAY.

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