Printer Friendly

FIRST AMERICAN, VANDERBILT AND METRO SCHOOLS UNVEIL GRANT FOR K-12 EDUCATION

 NASHVILLE, Tenn., May 26 /PRNewswire/ -- First American Corporation (NASDAQ-NMS: FATN), Vanderbilt University and Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools announced today that First American's commitment of employee time and grants totalling $380,000 will enable Peabody College to introduce advanced teaching techniques and technology to Tennessee schools, beginning in Nashville.
 "First American's initiative means fresh momentum for improved education in Nashville," said Vanderbilt Chancellor Joe B. Wyatt. "This type of corporate citizenship is essential if Nashville is to make the far-reaching changes that must be made to ensure that our students are prepared for tomorrow's challenges."
 "With support such as this from First American, Nashville's schools will serve as a model for all schools in Tennessee and in the nation. Ultimately, teachers, students, parents and corporate partners will join together to create a larger Learning Community, capable of linking to other Learning Communities throughout the state and the nation," Peabody Dean James Pellegrino said.
 Dennis C. Bottorff, president and CEO of First American Corporation, announced First American will give $380,000 to the effort over the next five years and provide personnel to serve as mentors in the Nashville schools participating in the initial phase of the project. An additional $120,000 will be given to Vanderbilt to support other areas of the University that are of special benefit to the state of Tennessee.
 "We are very pleased with the cutting-edge approach to educational reform that the Learning Communities Project is taking," Bottorff said. "We also like the excellent relationship that has already been established between Vanderbilt and Metro Schools and the opportunity for First American to provide some unique resources and perspectives as a corporate partner."
 Richard Benjamin, director of Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, said, "It is my dream that this partnership, and many others that are coming together throughout our city, will enable Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools to attain the national recognition mentioned by Mayor Bredesen in his State of the Metro speech this year -- that Nashville will be the place the world looks for success in public education and that we will have the satisfaction of knowing that our students are prepared, and looking forward to, a new millennium."
 Central to the Learning Communities design effort is the need to change dramatically the way teachers, students and others interact both inside and outside of the classroom. That includes creating new approaches to curriculum, instruction and assessment, as well as developing the technological infrastructure to support these new approaches and elicit higher levels of productivity.
 The work supported by First American in Metro Schools will enable Peabody and the schools to exchange knowledge with educators across Tennessee and the U.S. and provide staff to coordinate the research, development and implementation effort.
 Phase One of the model's curriculum-instruction-assessment components will be implemented beginning this fall in two classrooms in Nashville and four others distributed across Oakland, Calif., and Toronto, Ontario. The sites will be linked via computer to each other and to researchers at Peabody and other supporting institutions.
 Additional funding for various elements of the Learning Communities design project has been provided by the National Science Foundation, which has contributed financial backing for the research and development of the Jasper Woodbury series and the Smart Challenges.
 A grant from the St. Louis-based James S. McDonnell Foundation will integrate the Jasper program, the science instructional program and CSILE into a total of six classrooms across Nashville, Oakland and Toronto. In addition, McDonnell's funding provides for coordination and documentation of the entire effort through staff at the St. Louis Science Center, which hopes to implement the resulting new curriculum in a new middle school magnet, scheduled to open in the fall of 1995.
 -0- 5/26/93
 /EDITOR'S NOTE: A fuller release is available from Vanderbilt/
 /CONTACT: Sally Tucker, Vanderbilt University, 615-322-2706, or Sue Atkinson, First American Corporation, 615-320-7532/
 (FATN)


CO: First American Corporation; Vanderbilt University; Metropolitan
 Nashville Public Schools ST: Tennessee IN: FIN SU:


CM -- CH007 -- 2518 05/26/93 14:00 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 26, 1993
Words:663
Previous Article:BRENDLE'S ANNOUNCES EXTENSION OF EXCLUSIVITY PERIOD
Next Article:ADVANCE ECONOMIC BAROMETER STABLE IN APRIL
Topics:


Related Articles
WASHINGTON MUTUAL'S 'PUTT FOR EDUCATION' CONTEST RAISES NEARLY $46,000 FOR OREGON SCHOOLS
LILLY, PEW FUND VANDERBILT DIVERSITY PROJECTS
FIRST UNION DONATES 12 COMPUTERS FOR USE IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS
HONEYWELL FOUNDATION GRANTS $2.5 MILLION FOR EDUCATION, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND THE ARTS
E. Gordon Gee Named Chancellor of Vanderbilt University.
VANDERBILT UNIV./BELLSOUTH OPEN CLINIC W/ HEALTHCARE SOLUTION.
Lansbridge University's online Executive MBA students graduate with dual Canadian and U.S. degrees; Internet university graduates receive...
Vanderbilt University School of Nursing unveils extensive renovations to Godchaux Hall.
The Top 100 Employers.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters