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FILM AND VIDEO ANIMATORS USE SILICON GRAPHICS COMPUTERS FOR CREATIVE SPECIAL EFFECTS

 FILM AND VIDEO ANIMATORS USE SILICON GRAPHICS COMPUTERS
 FOR CREATIVE SPECIAL EFFECTS
 MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Dec. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Silicon Graphics Inc. (NYSE: SGI) announced today that several newly released films and videos feature amazing special effects generated on the company's IRIS(R) 4D family of 3D graphics workstations and servers. The films "Star Trek VI" from Paramount and Michael Jackson's "Black or White" video all feature special effects created on Silicon Graphics computer systems.
 The animation and special effects companies Pacific Data Images (PDI) and Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) use Silicon Graphics computer systems' digital compositing and video I/O capabilities to accelerate both the creative and production processes. Computer generated imaging can also be combined with live action and processed together in the computer by compositing incoming analog and digital video with real-time 3D graphics. This enables creative directors to preview effects, create interactivity between live actors and computer puppets, colorize or color correct movies and perform many other processing jobs, like wire removal or perspective correction.
 "Our quest has always been to build computer systems whose graphics emulate the real world," said David Bagshaw, vice president of marketing, Silicon Graphics. "The difference between great effects and good ones is in the creative end. Now with affordable systems in the $10,000 range, there is nothing standing in our way from helping animators' work look absolutely perfect."
 Viewers were dazzled by ILM's computer-based effects in the films "The Abyss" and "Terminator 2," but the demand to exceed expectations of show audiences is constant. According to Dennis Muren, visual effects supervisor at ILM, "We are always trying to top ourselves. We try to give the directors more than they ask for."
 One of the most exciting, new special effects is the "morph" effect. Morphing, or metamorphosizing one image or character into another, has been used in a number of notable works including ILM's "Terminator 2" movie and the stunning transformation of actors from multiple ethnic backgrounds by PDI for the Michael Jackson "Black or White" music video.
 Each morph effect has its own different problem and circumstance. For instance, the 3D graphics generated from the computer can be too "clean" or "crisp" compared to film. Special software has been created that can add grain to make the computer-generated images match the film. The concept involves simulating realism by adding imperfection. "There is really no one thing that you would call morph," said Ray Giarratana, senior animator and technical director at PDI. "It's a lot of different techniques that are used to become the effect that you see on video."
 Silicon Graphics offers a wide range of binary compatible 3D graphics computer systems. These include the desktop IRIS Indigo(TM) RISC personal computer beginning at $7,995, the deskside Personal IRIS(TM) family priced from $11,500 to $28,000 and the IRIS POWER Series(TM) graphics supercomputers priced from $49,900 to $224,900.
 Silicon Graphics Inc. is the leading manufacturer of visual computing systems. The company delivers three-dimensional graphics, color, audio, video and real-time technologies to the technical, scientific and creative computing marketplace. Silicon Graphics Inc. has offices worldwide and headquarters in Mountain View.
 Silicon Graphics, the Silicon Graphics logo and IRIS are registered trademarks, and IRIS Indigo, Personal IRIS and IRIS POWER Series are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Inc.
 -0- 12/17/91
 NOTE TO BROADCAST MEDIA: Silicon Graphics' video news release on "Computer-Generated Special Effects for Film" will be distributed via satellite on Wednesday, Dec. 18 at 1:30-2 p.m. EST and Wednesday, Dec. 26 at 12:30-1 p.m. EST. Satellite coordinates are: Telstar 301/Transponder 10V for both feeds.
 /CONTACT: Renee Wildman of Silicon Graphics Inc., 415-335-1026/
 (SGI) CO: Silicon Graphics Inc. ST: California IN: CPR SU:


DB -- SJ003 -- 2905 12/17/91 11:16 EST
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Date:Dec 17, 1991
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