Printer Friendly

FEDS MOVE TO LIMIT RAVENS IN CALIFORNIA DESERTS AGENCY'S GOAL IS TO PROTECT AREA'S THREATENED TORTOISE.

Byline: ANDREW SILVA

Staff Writer

There's always the disturbing part in those nature documentaries -- when the adorable little ones wind up as a meal for some other predator.

Mother Nature is a harsh mistress, but there's nothing natural about the way common ravens have decimated the struggling desert tortoise.

A plan to control ravens will soon be implemented by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency charged with protecting endangered species.

"There are problems with ravens that attack and eat juvenile tortoises," said Carl Benz, assistant field supervisor in the agency's Ventura office. "If we can reduce predation, it will be an important step in recovery" for the tortoise.

The threatened desert tortoise has seen its populations plummet as it faces a gantlet of threats: habitat loss, disease, vehicles, livestock, and ravens.

"Tortoises are threatened by the death of 1,000 cuts," said William Boarman, a tortoise researcher.

Ravens used to be rare in the desert, with limited food, water or nesting sites. In the 1940s, naturalists had a hard time even finding ravens in the Mojave Desert.

But as humans spread across the desert, the crow-like black birds flocked behind, able to find food in landfills, trash cans, campgrounds and outside restaurants.

Power poles, billboards, buildings, and even abandoned cars provided a vast network of places to build their nests.

Raven populations exploded sevenfold in the western Mojave, scientists estimate. The population in the Mojave and Colorado deserts of California is thought to range between 30,000 and 45,000 birds.

Juvenile tortoises provide a ready meal. The shells don't get hard enough to withstand a raven's beak until the slow-moving reptile is 4 years to 7 years old.

"As the shell develops, it gets stronger so it can stave off the pecks from a raven," Boarman said.

Given that tortoises don't reach reproductive age until they're 13 to 15, losing the younger generation makes it impossible for the population to remain stable, much less recover.

An adult, fertile female desert tortoise lays close to six eggs a year, but most of the hatchlings are lost to predation. Recovery plans for the threatened reptile likened the desert tortoise to the California condor, the black rhino and the blue whale -- all of which are in danger of extinction.

It's much easier for other species, including ravens, which can reproduce at ages 2 or 3, to generate a lot of new members in a hurry.

It doesn't help that tortoises are most active in the spring, during the same time the ravens are raising their hatchlings and most need food, Boarman said.

The plan preferred by the Fish and Wildlife Service is to restrict the food and water sources available to ravens, and to remove or kill ravens that are clearly preying on tortoises.
COPYRIGHT 2007 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2007, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Apr 24, 2007
Words:465
Previous Article:PARTNERS AGAINST CRIME PUBLIC ASKED TO HELP PLAN SAFE, HEALTHY, VIBRANT CITY.
Next Article:HONORING WOMAN WHO 'PUT PERSPECTIVE IN OUR LIVES' TRIBUTE GOES TO EX-FFA LEADER.
Topics:


Related Articles
Residents at risk: wildlife and the Bureau of Land Management's planning process.
Can we conserve California's threatened fisheries through natural community conservation planning?
Why did the turtle cross the road?
THE TORTOISE AND THE CATTLE RANCHER.
SLOW-GOING RACE UNDER WAY TO SAVE DESERT TORTOISE : BACTERIA, OFF-ROAD BIKES, DEVELOPMENT POSE BIGGEST THREATS TO DECLINING SPECIES.
THREATENED TORTOISES FACE RISING DANGER FROM PEOPLE.
OFF-ROADERS SUE OVER TORTOISE POLICY.
RAVENS IN CROSS-HAIRS? BIRDS MAY BE TARGETED IN MOVE TO PROTECT DESERT TORTOISES.
LIONS AND SQUIRRELS AND TORTOISES, OH MY! GROUPS AIM TO SAVE RARE CREATURES.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters