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European launch for long-awaited Windows Vista

The Microsoft boss, Bill Gates (person) Bill Gates - William Henry Gates III, Chief Executive Officer of Microsoft, which he co-founded in 1975 with Paul Allen. In 1994 Gates is a billionaire, worth $9.35b and Microsoft is worth about $27b. , promised that the long-awaited version of the Windows operating system operating system (OS)

Software that controls the operation of a computer, directs the input and output of data, keeps track of files, and controls the processing of computer programs.
 would revolutionise everything from making phone calls to watching television as he launched it in Europe today Europe Today is a daily radio news show on the BBC World Service about public affairs throughout Europe. It is presented by Audrey Carville at 17:00 GMT every weekday. External links
  • Europe Today official website
.

Unveiling the consumer version of the successor to Windows XP The previous client version of Windows. XP was a major upgrade to the client version of Windows 2000 with numerous changes to the user interface. XP improved support for gaming, digital photography, instant messaging, wireless networking and sharing connections to the Internet.  at the British Library in London, Mr Gates predicted a world in which television was personalised and students worked without paper textbooks.

"We're just at the beginning of that. We've just begun to see what we can do," he said.

Windows Vista - which has been more than five years in the making - was released alongside a new version of Microsoft's flagship Office business suite, which includes Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

Journalists and invited guests, some blogging from the launch, packed a British Library conference theatre for the event, which included a performance by British band the Feeling.

Mr Gates introduced the new operating system by reminding the audience that it was 24 years since Microsoft had produced the first version of Windows.

"Now, in Windows Vista, we have the foundation to take things to a whole new level," he said.

The Microsoft chairman said Windows Vista would revolutionise television by letting people watch personalised shows, for example containing longer news items on subjects they were interested in.

Even television advertising would be targeted to the individual viewer, he said.

However, concerns have already been voiced that Windows Vista's new features to protect computer users against viruses and identity theft are insufficient.

Mr Gates said extensive testing - including the help of 5m volunteers who downloaded early versions of the software - meant Windows Vista and 2007 Microsoft Office were the "highest quality products we've ever released".

He was joined on stage by the British Library chief executive, Lynne Brindley, to announce that two rare Leonardo Da Vinci Leonardo da Vinci (də vĭn`chē, Ital. lāōnär`dō dä vēn`chē), 1452–1519, Italian painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist, b. near Vinci, a hill village in Tuscany.  notebooks had been made freely accessible online for the first time.

The so-called Codex Leicester, part of Mr Gates's personal collection, can now be viewed alongside the Codex codex

Manuscript book, especially of Scripture, early literature, or ancient mythological or historical annals. The earliest type of manuscript in the form of a modern book (i.e.
 Arundel on the British Library's website.

Ms Brindley said the "electronic reunification re·u·ni·fy  
tr.v. re·u·ni·fied, re·u·ni·fy·ing, re·u·ni·fies
To cause (a group, party, state, or sect) to become unified again after being divided.
" of the Da Vinci da Vinci Surgery A surgical robot for performing certain surgeries–eg, mitral valve repair and laparoscopic procedures–eg, cholecystectomy and gastric ulcer repair. See Laparoscopic surgery, Robotics, Surgical robot.  manuscripts for the first time in 500 years would be the first use of the library's version of its Turning the Pages digitisation software.

Windows Vista's improved graphics handling makes digitising books and manuscripts much quicker, and means viewing them online is much smoother and more realistic, Mr Gates said.

The British Library is also working with Microsoft to finish copying 25m pages of its 19th century books into digital format this year.

Mr Gates hosted the worldwide launch of Vista in Times Square, New York New York, state, United States
New York, Middle Atlantic state of the United States. It is bordered by Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and the Atlantic Ocean (E), New Jersey and Pennsylvania (S), Lakes Erie and Ontario and the Canadian province of
, yesterday, supported by the punk band Angels and Airwaves, who played a version of Louis Armstrong's What a Wonderful World.
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Author:guardian.co.uk
Publication:guardian.co.uk
Date:Jan 30, 2007
Words:453
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