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Electrical safety saves lives.

ELECTROCUTIONS IN THEATER ARE HAPPENING.

THESE DEATHS ARE SAD AND, UNFORTUNATELY, EVEN SADDER, MOST OF THE DEATHS WERE PREVENTABLE WITH JUST SOME BASIC PM.

HERE ARE SOME PM TIPS FROM THE PROGRAM MANAGER'S OFFICE FOR MOBILE ELECTRIC POWER THAT WILL HELP SOLDIERS SAVE SOLDIERS' LIVES.

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1. Look for bad wiring. Inspecting wiring is every Soldier's responsibility. It may not be your job to fix a wiring problem, but it is your job to report it.

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2. Check for grounds. Every ground has two ends: One end attaches to a piece of equipment or shelter and the other end is firmly planted in the earth. Every Soldier needs to notice grounds and be able to trace them from the equipment to the earth. Grounding situations that look wrong or hazardous need to be reported. It's always better to be safe than sorry.

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3. Equipment grounding conductors (EGCs) or bonding wires are just as important as earth grounds and also need to be checked. They are for your protection, too! Equipment specialists need to ensure that a low-impedance path to clear the mobile power equipment circuit breakers is in place and intact. Use your TM to check for a damaged EGC and the steps to take if you find one.

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4. Co-located shelters need to have their grounds bonded. A voltage difference between two shelters can lead to shocks and, yes, even electrocution! It's best that this bond is done at the ground connections of the power generation equipment-bond co-located generators--to avoid ground loops.

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5. Ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) and circuit breakers need to be checked. They are for your protection. But if they are also not maintained, they will not work. And if they don't work, they won't be protecting anyone! Check

'em! Test them at least monthly. And for goodness sakes, opening a ground circuit does not cure a circuit breaker tripping problem. It just creates another problem--a hazardous one!

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Whether it's mobile power equipment or fixed installations, nominal voltage cannot be taken for granted in electrical systems in theater. All Soldiers are on the inspection team for spotting electrical problems. Qualified Soldiers must verify voltage, good grounding, good wiring, good bonding and ensure that all electrical safety procedures are followed.

For help, get a copy of CECOM pamphlet TR 98-6, Earth Grounding and Bonding. Email CECOM for a copy:

john.tobias@us.army.mil

Also, take the training courses at: www.monmouth.army.mil/CECOM/ safety/training/training_esafety.htm http://www.monmouth.army.mil/cecom/ safety/training/training_electric.htm

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Title Annotation:Mobile Power Equipment ...
Publication:PS, the Preventive Maintenance Monthly
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jul 1, 2009
Words:435
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