Printer Friendly

East German nudists let it all hang out, 20 years on

"It has nothing to do with sex," insisted Udo Schumacher, 64, as he stood, stark naked, on a beautiful but bracing beach in Prerow in what was once communist East Germany.

"If you go in and experience how lovely it is to swim with a naked body, and come out without wet trunks on, you feel healthy. And if you can get over the fact that you are naked, it is great," he told AFP (1) (AppleTalk Filing Protocol) The file sharing protocol used in an AppleTalk network. In order for non-Apple networks to access data in an AppleShare server, their protocols must translate into the AFP language. See file sharing protocol.  back in August.

"Freikoerperkultur" ("Free body culture"), or "FKK FKK Freikörper-Kultur (German: free body culture; naturism/nudism) " for short, was hugely popular in the otherwise highly restrictive German Democratic Republic (GDR GDR

See Global Depositary Receipt (GDR).
), much more so than in West Germany.

And 20 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall this November 9, the habit is still going strong, and has even attracted a loyal band of followers from what was West Germany to the beaches of the east.

With life so tightly controlled in other ways -- no freedom of speech, little freedom to travel, the Stasi secret police spying on citizens -- FKK was a rare liberty that people made full use of in the GDR.

"It was one of the few liberties," said Schumacher, who is from Dortmund in the west. "I get the feeling that people in the GDR said to the authorities, 'Don't take this away from us as well'."

Nowhere was this more evident than here in Prerow, a picturesque seaside town 300 kilometres (190 miles) north of Berlin, with its long, pristine beaches, sand dunes and crystal-clear, if chilly, water.

Here in GDR times, 2,500 border guards, 70 watch towers, searchlights, barbed wire barbed wire, wire composed of two zinc-coated steel strands twisted together and having barbs spaced regularly along them. The need for barbed wire arose in the 19th cent. , boats and radar all made sure no one escaped by sea to West Germany or to Denmark, Doris Pegel, 53, curator of the local museum, told AFP.

Sailing and even surfing were off limits. But one thing people were allowed to do in the shadow of Prerow's watchtowers, and on other beaches and lakes around the communist country, was to indulge in FKK.

And indulge they did, in huge numbers, as people flocked to the seaside in summer and gave FKK a try. In Prerow, for example, nudists created one of the GDR's first nudist campsites, where demand for pitches was massive.

When the GDR was still young, however, the Politburo saw FKK as a hangover from the Nazis and as dangerous petty bourgeois degeneracy Degeneracy (quantum mechanics)

A term referring to the fact that two or more stationary states of the same quantum-mechanical system may have the same energy even though their wave functions are not the same.
, Josie McLellan, a modern history lecturer at Britain's University of Bristol who has researched the phenomenon, told AFP.

Such suspicions were not helped by events in Prerow, where nudists gathered on the beach and the sand dunes at night, daubing body parts with toothpaste and wearing African-style headgear headgear,
n the apparatus encircling the head or neck and providing attachment for an intraoral appliance in use of extraoral anchorage.

headgear, radiologic,
n a device that is used to protect the head from injury by radiation.
 for debauched de·bauch  
v. de·bauched, de·bauch·ing, de·bauch·es

v.tr.
1.
a. To corrupt morally.

b. To lead away from excellence or virtue.

2.
 "Cameroon Parties."

With the ministry of the interior calling nudism nudism or naturism, practice of going without clothing in social settings, generally in mixed gender groups and for purposes of good health or personal comfort.  a threat to the "natural and healthy feelings of our working people", the authorities tried to stamp out to put an end to by sudden and energetic action; to extinguish; as, to stamp out a rebellion s>.

See also: Stamp
 FKK in the 1950s.

But many nudists were also party members, policeman and even judges, who protested that "doing FKK" and being a good communist were not mutually exclusive, and that nudism was non-sexual.

"Here, the woman is not an object of desire, she is a comrade, there is no bikini to excite you," McLellan cites one contributor to an illuminating 1966 survey of nudists as saying.

A widespread campaign of popular resistance soon made the authorities relent re·lent  
v. re·lent·ed, re·lent·ing, re·lents

v.intr.
To become more lenient, compassionate, or forgiving. See Synonyms at yield.

v.tr. Obsolete
1.
, and by the 1960s and 1970s onwards FKK was almost a national pastime that was even encouraged by the regime.

It became much more popular than in both Western Europe and in the rest of the Eastern Bloc, with the possible exception of the beaches of Croatia in the former Yugoslavia.

This was because although nudism was tolerated, belonging to any kind of nudist organisation was banned. Such logic made FKK more popular since people could just give it a try, without having to join a club first.

As one joke put it: "What do you call a gathering of two or more GDR citizens? An illegal meeting. Or a nudist beach."

When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, Doris Pegel was in West Germany, and remembers phoning home in Prerow and being told that, along with everywhere else in the GDR, there were joyous scenes.

"I was told, 'They're surfing on the beach in Prerow'," Pegel told AFP.

But of the many things to flood eastwards after German unification in 1990, one of the less welcome was a certain prudishness prud·ish  
adj.
Marked by or exhibiting the characteristics of a prude; priggish.



prudish·ly adv.
 towards nudism on the part of the curious new "Wessi" ("Westerner west·ern·er also West·ern·er  
n.
A native or inhabitant of the west, especially the western United States.


Westerner
Noun

a person from the west of a country or region

Noun 1.
") tourists.

The result was an effort to regulate the hobby more, and to demarcate de·mar·cate  
tr.v. de·mar·cat·ed, de·mar·cat·ing, de·mar·cates
1. To set the boundaries of; delimit.

2. To separate clearly as if by boundaries; distinguish: demarcate categories.
 beaches and lakes into FKK and clothed areas.

A look around in Prerow today shows that although the GDR is long dead, the old spirit of FKK has survived.

"Here it's all very mixed because people don't have a problem with it. It's supposed to be separated but nobody really minds," 66-year-old nudist Inge told AFP on Prerow beach.

A naked Werner Tallen, a 60-year-old lawyer, meanwhile insisted with a smile that he travelled the 825 kilometres (510 miles) from his home in Munich "because of the Baltic, not because of FKK."
Copyright 2009 AFP Global Edition
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright (c) Mochila, Inc.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Author:AFP
Publication:AFP Global Edition
Date:Nov 5, 2009
Words:844
Previous Article:UN to pull non-essential staff from Afghanistan
Next Article:Matsui powers Yankees to World Series title


Related Articles
Nudists enter Guinness Book for largest simultaneous skinny dip.
Nudist club offers rooms to inauguration bare-devils

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters