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EPISCOPALIANS EXPLORE ENGLISH ROOTS.

Byline: Holly Andres Staff Writer

ENCINO - Curiosity, not sunscreen, is all that's required for a trip around the world - the Anglican Church world - as a four-part lecture series begins today at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church.

``The Episcopal Church is unusual because it is very consciously part of a worldwide family,'' said the Rev. James E. Furman of St. Nicholas. ``There is an awareness of that connection because each member church has a common origin - the Anglican Church in England. This series will be like leafing through a family photo album.''

The first stop on the ``Anglican Adventure'' will be Nathan Tierney's personal insights into his 1960s school years at Christ Church Grammar School in South Yarra, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia.

``One thing I want to impress upon people is that Anglicanism is a very diverse body. Over the last 200 years it has been shaped and molded by cultures around the world,'' said Tierney, the chairman of the philosophy department at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks and the author of ``Imagination and Ethical Ideals.''

``The Anglican Church in Australia has become less English as the identity of Australia as a nation has started to identify more with the Asian Pacific nations,'' he said. ``One of the strengths of the Anglican Church is that it lets cultures do different things and that's healthy.''

Furman is enthusiastic about the community discovering and becoming enriched by the spiritual resources from Anglican churches around the world.

``Bishop (Sergio) Carranza, who will be the last of our speakers, has talked about the Mexican Anglican approach to Lent. While we concentrate on individual sin consciousness and fasting here, they look forward to eating special Lenten dishes that are only eaten at that time of the year. It's very enriching to share those traditions.''

Furman's ``mood piece,'' as he envisions each of the Saturday talks, will be a slide show presentation on All Saints Church in Notting Hill, London. The Afro-Caribbean Anglican church, with congregational roots in Barbados, is a sister church to St. Nicholas.

Nickey Sawyer has been a member of St. Nicholas since 1985. As the church's education director for more than nine years, Sawyer said Furman enjoys scheduling thematic lecture series twice a year.

``Many people come to our church `new' and they don't know what we are. People wonder what is that `Anglican' thing on our sign?'' laughed Sawyer. ``People think, is everyone in there from England? This series gives us all a chance to learn more about who we are as a worldwide Anglican community.''

AT A GLANCE

Nathan Tierney, ``Australia: Growing Up Anglican'' at 5:30 p.m. today at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 17114 Ventura Blvd., Encino. Fellowship at 5 p.m. and a dinner at 6:30 p.m. Dinner tickets, $8, reservations requested. Upcoming lectures: ``England: The Mother Church,'' on May 17; Lester MacKenzie, ``South Africa: Unity in Christ'' on May 24 and Bishop Sergio Carranza, ``Mexico: The Spirituality of Mexico'' on May 31. Call (818) 788-4570 or saintnicks.org.

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St. Nicholas Episcopal Church's Nickey Sawyer and the Rev. James E. Furman are eager to share their common origin.

John Lazar/Staff Photographer

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AT A GLANCE (see text)
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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:May 10, 2003
Words:538
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