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EPA TO SHIP OUT LAST OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AT THE FABRITEX MILLS IN LONG VALLEY, N.J., TRIGGERING THE END OF A SUPERFUND CLEANUP

    EPA TO SHIP OUT LAST OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AT THE FABRITEX MILLS
     IN LONG VALLEY, N.J., TRIGGERING THE END OF A SUPERFUND CLEANUP
    NEW YORK, Nov. 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will remove the last drums of hazardous materials from the now defunct Fabritex Mills in Long Valley, N.J., a former coated fabric manufacturing operation located in the Cleveland Industrial Center.
    EPA conducted the removal action at the Fabritex site, which consists of seven buildings that contained approximately 1,000 containers of waste chemicals and other substances.  The hazardous material was left at the site after the company went out of business in the late 1980's.  Superfund is the federal program to clean up abandoned hazardous waste sites.
    The clean-up consisted of transferring hazardous substances from leaking or deteriorated containers to new containers; bulking compatible hazardous substances together and repackaging into new containers; stabilizing hazardous substances, such as powdered asbestos; and removing the materials from the site for either proper disposal or for recycling.
    EPA Regional Administrator Constantine Sidamon-Eristoff said, "The site was potentially dangerous to the public before the removal of the hazardous materials.  The agency began work at the site last March, in response to a request for assistance from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy.  With the assistance and full cooperation of local officials, fire and police departments, EPA secured the buildings to prevent unauthorized access, and compiled an inventory of the chemicals to determine type and quantity of chemicals on site. As of today, removed the waste from the site to be disposed of properly."
    "The agency was able to recycle many of the chemicals removed from the site.  There were more than 150 containers returned to the original manufacturers," he added.
    Originally the removal was expected to cost as much as $700,000. However, cost savings achieved by returning many of the chemicals to their original manufacturers, and significantly lower disposal costs resulted in the removal costing less than $600,000.
    EPA funded the cleanup, and will continue to utilize its enforcement authority under Superfund to recover the costs of the remediation from the responsible parties.
    -0-              11/18/91
    /CONTACT:  Mary Breitenbach of United States Environmental Protection Agency, 212-264-2515/ CO:  Environmental Protection Agency ST:  New Jersey IN: SU: SM-OS -- NY029 -- 1311 11/18/91 10:11 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 18, 1991
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