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EPA AND STATE OF MARYLAND SELECT CLEAN-UP METHODS FOR CONTAMINATION AT ALLIED-SIGNAL FACILITY IN BALTIMORE

 EPA AND STATE OF MARYLAND SELECT CLEAN-UP METHODS
 FOR CONTAMINATION AT ALLIED-SIGNAL FACILITY IN BALTIMORE
 PHILADELPHIA, May 18 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region III and Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) have selected the corrective measures to be used in the clean-up of hazardous waste at the Allied-Signal Inc. Baltimore Works Facility in the Fells Point section of Baltimore.
 EPA and MDE have prepared at Record of Decision which includes the Final Decision and the Response to Comments, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the federal law which governs the management of hazardous waste. The Record of Decision describes the methods selected for clean-up as well as the selection process.
 In September 1989, a Consent Decree between EPA, MDE, and Allied was entered in the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland requiring Allied to conduct environmental investigations on the nature and extent of contamination at the facility. The company was also required to submit reports on these investigations and a Corrective Measures Implementation Program Plan (CMIPP) to prevent further migration of contamination from the facility.
 EPA and MDE issued a Statement of Basis in October 1991, which tentatively approved the corrective measures on the CMIPP, pending public comment. Todays decision is the final approval.
 The corrective measures call for (1) continuing to dismantle existing buildings and structures at the facility site; (2) building a new embankment on the water-side perimeter of the site to support the old and failing bulkheads and prevent the collapse of chromium- contaminated soil into the Inner Harbor; (3) installing a deep vertical hydraulic barrier to reduce the ability of chromium- contaminated water to flow beyond the site into the Inner Harbor or the groundwater; (4) constructing an impermeable cap over the area within the hydraulic barrier to prevent water from infiltrating the area contained within the hydraulic barrier; (5) initiating a groundwater maintenance system which will prevent contaminated groundwater from flowing outward from the area contained within the deep hydraulic barrier; (6) conducting environmental monitoring of air, surface water, groundwater, harbor sediments and aquatic life; (7) installing a layered soil cap over the southeast quadrant of the site; (8) clearing and removing plant roots from an adjacent property on South Caroline Street, and as necessary to prevent a health risk, covering this property with two feet of clean soil.
 Environmental investigations at the facility have shown chromium to be present in the shallow and deep groundwater aquifers near the chemical manufacturing buildings. The studies also found that the contaminated groundwater has migrated from the site into the deep groundwater beneath the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River. Chromium has also been found in soil samples on-site.
 Allied's Baltimore Works is located on a peninsula on the northeast shore of Baltimore's Inner Harbor. A former chromium chemical manufacturing facility, the site had two main production buildings and many support buildings which encompassed about 20 acres.
 Allied Chemical Corporation and Allied Corporation, predecessors to Allied-Signal Inc., operated the facility from 1954, when it was purchased from Mutual Chemical Corporation, until it ceased operations in 1985. Chromium chemical manufacturing has occurred a this location for about 140 years.
 Two types of chromium are present at the site, hexavalent and trivalent. Hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic to humans through inhalation and causes kidney damage in animals and humans. Trivalent chromium's main effect is contact dermatitis (a skin rash) in sensitive individuals.
 -0- 5/18/92
 /CONTACT: Ruth Podems of the U.S. EPA, 215-597-4164/ CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Allied-Signal Inc. ST: Maryland IN: SU:


JS-JR -- PH029 -- 1513 05/18/92 17:04 EDT
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Date:May 18, 1992
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