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ELECTRONIC CRAWLING TRAINER PRESENTED BY XEROX TO HELP MARY CARIOLA CENTER AID CHILDREN WITH MULTIPLE HANDICAPS

 ELECTRONIC CRAWLING TRAINER PRESENTED BY XEROX TO HELP
 MARY CARIOLA CENTER AID CHILDREN WITH MULTIPLE HANDICAPS
 ROCHESTER, N.Y., Feb. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- An electronic mat designed to help children with multiple physical and neurological handicaps learn to crawl was donated here today to the Mary Cariola Children's Center by Xerox Corporation (NYSE: XRX).
 The Crawling Mat Trainer was developed and designed by John S. Wright, a member of the research staff at the Xerox Webster Research Center, during a 10-month social service leave. Supplemental funding for the trainer was provided by the New York State Science and Technology Foundation.
 Its technology will be shared with other agencies around the country that serve children with similar handicaps, said Paul Scott, president of the Mary Cariola Children's Center. The Mary Cariola Center serves about 450 Rochester-area children, from birth to age 21, who have a wide range of developmental disabilities.
 The presentation of the Crawling Mat Trainer took place at a reception in the Al Sigl Center, at which the Mary Cariola Children's Center is located.
 "Crawling is a key developmental milestone for all children, and it is a prerequisite for acquiring many higher skills," Scott said. "But many of our children are so severely handicapped that crawling does not come naturally. They must be taught this and other skills that other children develop by instinct.
 "The Crawling Mat Trainer will provide another way to 'teach' our children. It provides both audio and visual stimuli to encourage the children to roll over, to kneel and to rock back and forth on their hands and knees."
 The Trainer is composed of a grid of lights housed in a five-foot by two-foot panel. A pair of audio speakers also is housed at one end of the panel, on either side.
 Digital recordings of parental voices or other audio stimuli are stored in a computer that also controls the light grid to create patterns. The computer also can control accessories such as electrically powered moving toys and even interactive devices. A programming language was developed for the Crawling Mat Trainer so that programs combining such audio-visual stimuli can be developed to fit the specific training needs of each child.
 A single trainer panel can be used alone or interconnected with additional panels in a variety of configurations.
 "The Webster Research Center has a history of being involved in the community," noted Mark B. Myers, Xerox vice president and general manager of the Xerox Corporate Research Group, who presented the Crawling Mat Trainer to the Mary Cariola Center. "We are delighted that John Wright was able to make a contribution through such a meaningful social service project."
 During the program, Steven B. Bolte, vice president and manager of the Webster Research Center, presented an original painting to the Mary Cariola Children's Center.
 The painting, by Kenneth Francis Dewey of Sherman-Eckert Graphics Design, depicts kites being flown by the Mary Cariola children, with only their hands and arms visible through a window, while their empty wheelchairs are thrown together outside.
 "This painting really captures the free, soaring spirits of the handicapped children you serve," Bolte said. "You make their spirits soar not only with the therapy, but with the love that you give to them. John Wright made an excellent choice for his social-service leave, and we appreciate the opportunity to share his involvement with your work."
 A limited edition of 1,000 prints of the painting was also presented to the Mary Cariola Center.
 Wright's project was made possible by the Xerox Social Service Leave program, which enables the company's United States employees to take up to a year with full pay and benefits to devote all their time, energy and talent to social causes of their own choice. Leave proposals from volunteers are evaluated and selected by a peer committee.
 The program, now in its 20th year, was the first of its kind. It guarantees re-entry to Xerox without loss of status or seniority. As of the end of 1991, 383 Xerox employees have taken Social Service leaves.
 -0- 2/6/92
 /CONTACT: Elisa Root of Mary Cariola Children's Center, 716-271-0761, or Arthur J. Zuckerman of Xerox Corporation, 716-423-4205/
 (XRX) CO: Xerox Corporation ST: New York IN: CPR SU:


KK -- CL021 -- 7738 02/06/92 12:34 EST
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Date:Feb 6, 1992
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