Printer Friendly

EDUCATORS ASKED TO ADD VALUE TO 'VITAL' TOURISM JOBS

 TALLAHASSEE, Fla., Feb. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Jobs in tourism pay more than most Floridians think, and should no be overlooked in a state's search for high-tech payrolls for the future, a tourism leader told the State Board of Community Colleges Today.
 In comments on a statewide master plan developed by the community colleges for their work in the next half decade, Florida Tourism Association President John E. Evans urged educators not to let a desire to encourage new economic enterprises detract from helping those in tourism gain new skills. "There is a real fear in the tourism industry of Florida that our failure to recognize and value tourism's contributions to the economy...may cost us dearly in the short term and hamper our long term economic stability," Evans told the board.
 While noting that tourism accounts for $87 million a day in Florida economic activity and pumps $4.7 million a day into state coffers from sales taxes paid by tourists, Evans said the industry is still in a growth mode. He noted that a slight dip in tourism in the last 24 months has reduced tourism related employment by nearly 100,000 jobs. And he argued those are desirable jobs.
 "There is a widely held perception in governmental, and in some academic, circles that the jobs of tourism are minimum wage and not very desirable for the Florida of the future," he said. Citing figures from the current Florida Statistical Abstract, Evans said that "the average Florida tourism job pays $8 per hour. Eighty-six percent of the nearly 450,000 tourism workers who depend on a payroll for their income are paid between $6.26 and $10.50 an hour ($13,021 - $21,840 per year) and nearly 10 percent more earned up to $17.90 an hour ($37,232 per year)." Evans suggested tourism jobs are especially valuable in providing entry level opportunities for minorities, students and active elderly residents that would not be replaced by high-technology firms and could force thousands of workers to become a drain on state resources.
 Evans told the community college leaders that "as tourism becomes more sophisticated, in every area from reservations through security, from marketing to food service management, the opportunities for value- added jobs enhanced through education multiply."
 -0- 2/12/93
 /CONTACT: John E. Evans of the Florida Tourism Association, 904-239-9759/


CO: Florida Tourism Association ST: Florida IN: SU:

JB-SS -- FL006 -- 6170 02/12/93 13:00 EST
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 12, 1993
Words:408
Previous Article:JANUARY TRAFFIC FOR MESA AIRLINES INCREASES
Next Article:SHIRTMAKER JK DAWSON PICKS MIAMI FOR START-UP FACILITY; COMPANY EXECUTIVE CITES AREA'S LABOR, SERVICE RESOURCES
Topics:


Related Articles
Tourism a growth engine.
Quality of place: for the first time, substantial state support will be used for the development of our tourism product.
Steady tourism growth projected.
Investing in tourism.
Callforbetter tourism jobs.
Rediscover the hidden treasures found here at home.
JITOA's job fair.
WIDE RANGE OF JOBS AND GOOD CAREER PROGRESSION; The tourism and hospitality sectors are welcoming new recruits, says Geoff Hodgson, chairman of North...
Hospitality and tourism sectors welcome recruits; Advertising Feature.
TOURISTS SPENT pounds 1.6BN IN 2008; - and it's going to get better by 2020, predict city experts.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters