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Domestic orders define top Canadian military contractors: 1994-95 ranking.

[Part 1 of 2]

Table 1: Top 20 Canadian Military Prime Contractors FY 1994-95

      Company head office/main plant         A    B    C    D     E     F


1. Frontec Logistics Corp (1), Edmonton       1
2. General Motors of Canada Ltd, Diesel
Division, London, Ontario
3. SNC-Lavalin Group, Montreal                2
4. SHL Systemhouse Inc, Ottawa                3
5. Bombardier Inc, Montreal                   4         1
6. Bristol Aerospace Ltd, Winnipeg            9     3  19
7. CAE Inc, Montreal                          5         6
8. Hawker Siddeley Canada Inc, Mississauga    6    20
9. IMP Group, Halifax                         7
10. Unisys GSG Canada Inc, Montreal           8    23  16
11. Nova Signaal Inc, Halifax                10
12. Boeing Canada Ltd, Toronto               11
13. Standard Aero Ltd, Winnipeg              12    10
14. Heroux Inc, Montreal                            1  18
15. Spar Aerospace Ltd, Mississauga          15    11   9
16. Lockheed Canada Inc, Kanata              13
17. Tallon Metal Technologies Inc, Pointe
Claire, Quebec                               14
18. Liftking Inc, Woodbridge, Ontario               2
19. Allied-Signal Aerospace Canada Inc,
Etobicoke, Ontario                           16    24   5
20. Valcom Ltd, Guelph, Ontario              18    14
Total

[Part 2 of 2]

Table 1: Top 20 Canadian Military Prime Contractors FY 1994-95

      Company head office/main plant          G    H     I


1. Frontec Logistics Corp (1), Edmonton            9    254.6
2. General Motors of Canada Ltd, Diesel
Division, London, Ontario                      4    238.3
3. SNC-Lavalin Group, Montreal                     5    171.3
4. SHL Systemhouse Inc, Ottawa                 7    151.1
5. Bombardier Inc, Montreal                        1    113.8
6. Bristol Aerospace Ltd, Winnipeg             1     87.5
7. CAE Inc, Montreal                               1     76.8
8. Hawker Siddeley Canada Inc, Mississauga     1     65.0
9. IMP Group, Halifax                              1     59.4
10. Unisys GSG Canada Inc, Montreal            2     56.9
11. Nova Signaal Inc, Halifax                      2     43.3
12. Boeing Canada Ltd, Toronto                 1     42.8
13. Standard Aero Ltd, Winnipeg                1     39.5
14. Heroux Inc, Montreal                           1     29.8
15. Spar Aerospace Ltd, Mississauga                1     29.2
16. Lockheed Canada Inc, Kanata                2     29.1
17. Tallon Metal Technologies Inc, Pointe
Claire, Quebec                                     9     28.3
18. Liftking Inc, Woodbridge, Ontario              4     23.9
19. Allied-Signal Aerospace Canada Inc,
Etobicoke, Ontario                             1     23.2
20. Valcom Ltd, Guelph, Ontario                    2     23.0
Total                                                 1,586.8

(1) Department of National Defence contract for $255-million jointly held
with Pan Arctic Inuit Logistics Corp, Yellowknife.



Legend


A Ranking within top 25 Department of National Defence prime contract
recipients in Canada for the period, fiscal year 1994-95.

B Ranking within top 25 US Department of Defense prime contract recipients
in Canada for the period.

C Ranking within top 25 Defence Industry Productivity Program recipients
for the period.

D Estimated or reported military sales greater than 50% of total sales.

E Estimated or reported export sales greater than 50% of total sales.

F Reported military sales or deliveries to one or more Third World
countries during the period.

G Foreign-owned or controlled.

H Commodity-classification of major military products (1-Aerospace;
2-Electronics; 3-Marine; 4-Transportation; 5-Armaments; 6-Industrial;
7-Data Processing; 8-Research and Development; 9-Miscellaneous).

I Total value of reported prime contracts during the period in $millions.

Note: The figures here may be less than total military sales (see
Methodology note on page 15).


Domestic military orders were the largest source of business for Canada's top prime military contractors again in fiscal year 1994-95, the latest contractor ranking from Project Ploughshares' Canadian Military Industry Database shows. Although some companies obtained foreign contracts large enough to place them within the top 20 list, the overwhelming majority of the largest contractors were dependent on Canadian Department of National Defence procurement The fancy word for "purchasing." The procurement department within an organization manages all the major purchases.  for most of their military production. Thus, in spite of persistent government and industry efforts to expand military export sales, the latest ranking reflects the post-Cold War realities of highly competitive foreign markets.

The distribution of prime military contracts remained concentrated within the largest 20 companies. Almost $1.6-billion of prime contracts awarded during 1994-95 went to the top 20 companies, close to two-thirds of the $2.5-billion total. As in earlier years, most top contractors were based in central Canada Central Canada (sometimes the Central provinces) is a region comprised of Canada's two largest and most populous provinces: Ontario and Quebec. Central Canada, with the four Atlantic provinces, form Eastern Canada. , with only five companies based elsewhere (Halifax, Winnipeg, and Edmonton). Similarly, the majority of the largest companies operated mainly in the aerospace or electronics sectors: just six of the top 20 were based in other economic sectors, and of these, only one was primarily involved in the production of armaments.

Reflective of the spending constraints CONSTRAINTS - A language for solving constraints using value inference.

["CONSTRAINTS: A Language for Expressing Almost-Hierarchical Descriptions", G.J. Sussman et al, Artif Intell 14(1):1-39 (Aug 1980)].
 that have come even to the Department of National Defence, several of the year's largest DND DND Drag and Drop
DND Department of National Defence (Canada & Australia)
DND Do Not Disturb
DND Dungeons and Dragons
DND Den Norske Dataforening
DND Direct Nanoparticle Deposition
DND Drugs for Neglected Diseases
 contracts were not for the acquisition of new equipment but for repair, overhaul, maintenance, or upgrading of existing military materiel ma·te·ri·el or ma·té·ri·el  
n.
The equipment, apparatus, and supplies of a military force or other organization. See Synonyms at equipment.
. This was apparent in the large 1994-95 contracts awarded to Bombardier's Canadair Division, Bristol Aerospace Bristol Aerospace is a Canadian aerospace firm located in Winnipeg, Manitoba. It is now an operating division of Magellan Aerospace. History
What would eventually become Bristol Aerospace began in 1904, when brothers Jim and Grant MacDonald moved to Winnipeg from Nova
, CAE (1) (Computer-Aided Engineering) Software that analyzes designs which have been created in the computer or that have been created elsewhere and entered into the computer.  Aviation, and IMP Group The IMP Group International is a diversified company based in Halifax, Nova Scotia founded in 1967 by industrialist Kenneth Rowe. IMP employs approximately 3,500 people. CanJet is a subsidiary company.  to maintain or modernize mod·ern·ize  
v. mo·dern·ized, mo·dern·iz·ing, mo·dern·iz·es

v.tr.
To make modern in appearance, style, or character; update.

v.intr.
To accept or adopt modern ways, ideas, or style.
 CF-18 Hornet The McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet (CF-188) is a Canadian Forces aircraft, based on the American F/A-18 Hornet. Development
Background

The final assembly line for the Hornet was in St.
, CF-5, C-130 Hercules, and CP-140 Aurora The Lockheed CP-140 Aurora is a Canadian Forces Air Command (AIRCOM) maritime patrol aircraft (MPA). The aircraft is based on the Lockheed P-3 Orion airframe, but mounts the more advanced electronics suite of the S-3 Viking. Aurora is the Greek goddess who restored Orion's eyesight.  aircraft respectively. Similarly, Hawker Siddeley Canada Hawker Siddeley Canada was the Canadian unit of the Hawker Siddeley Group of the United Kingdom and manufactured railcars, streetcars and aircraft engines from the 1960s to 1980s.  was engaged to maintain DND military aircraft engines and Boeing Canada to repair CH-113 Labrador helicopters.

The year's largest contract ($255-million) was awarded to Edmonton's Frontec Logistics Corp, which in partnership with Pan Arctic Inuit Logistics Corp of Yellowknife, will operate and maintain 47 short- and long-range radar sites within the North Warning System. SNC SNC St Norbert College (De Pere, Wisconsin)
SNC Sistema Nervioso Central
SNC Société en Nom Collectif (French: Partnership)
SNC Système Nerveux Central (French: central nervous system) 
 Industrial Technologies received orders for ammunition This article is largely based on the article in the out-of-copyright 11th edition of the Encyclopdia Britannica, which was produced in 1911. It should be brought up to date to reflect subsequent history or scholarship (including the references, if any).  from the Canadian army worth $170-million, and SHL SHL Shift Logical Left
SHL Schweizerische Hochschule für Landwirtschaft (German: Swiss College of Agriculture)
SHL Southern Hockey League
SHL Silver Haired Legislature
SHL Single Hidden Layer (neural networks) 
 Systemhouse, an Ottawa-based information technology firm, was given a $150-million contract to upgrade the Canadian Forces supply system.

Export and major equipment orders were central to a few of the year's largest military contractors. General Motor's second-place ranking was due entirely to contracts to produce light armoured vehicles armoured vehicle

Motor vehicle with plating for protection against bullets, shells, or other projectiles that moves on wheels or tracks. The tank is the chief armoured vehicle for larger military forces.
 for Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia (sä`dē ərā`bēə, sou`–, sô–), officially Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, kingdom (2005 est. pop.  and Australia totalling $219-million and $14-million respectively. Bristol Aerospace won $20-million in orders for target helicopters from the US Army, and Heroux received $28-million in US Air Force contracts to produce military aircraft landing gears.
COPYRIGHT 1996 Project Ploughshares
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1996, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Author:Ken Epps
Publication:Ploughshares Monitor
Date:Dec 1, 1996
Words:949
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