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Dirty does it: Zero/DGK fresh 'til death tour.

FUELED BY WAFFLE HOUSE Waffle House is a restaurant chain with over 1700 stores found in 25 states in the United States.[1] The "low-rent roadside cafe featuring waffles"[2]  and Chick-fil-A is how the Zero/DGK crews smashed thru the Dirty Dirty. It was late July--so, hotter than Hell to say the least--and the humidity constantly drenched drench  
tr.v. drenched, drench·ing, drench·es
1. To wet through and through; soak.

2. To administer a large oral dose of liquid medicine to (an animal).

3.
 our clothing with sweat. With a full 15-passenger van, you'd wish we were a little fresher. But we were closer to the smell of death instead.

The demos were plentiful and the drives were way too long. Florida, Alabama, ATL (Active Template Library) A set of software routines from Microsoft that provide the basic framework for creating ActiveX and COM objects. Stemming from the standard template library (STL) that comes with C++ compilers, ATL includes an object wizard that sets up , North 'Caka, Virginia ... The states flew by. But if you were fortunate enough to witness the top-notch, eye-candy skating, you got to take in a real treat to say the least.

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You had Chris Cole
For the professional skateboarder, see Chris Cole (skateboarder).
For the American football player, see Chris Cole (American football player).
 and the Zero team and Steve Williams and The DGK DGK Deutsche Geodätische Kommission (German geodetic commission)
DGK Deutschen Grünen Kreuzes (für Gesundheit)
DGK Dirty Ghetto Kids (skateboard company)
DGK Directory Gatekeeper
 crew. The evenings were marked by bed-bug-ridden hotels, with prostitutes and pimps to boot. One of the fair maidens of the night asked us for some double AAs for her vibrator vibrator /vi·bra·tor/ (vi´bra-tor) an instrument for producing vibrations.

vibrator

an apparatus used in vibratory treatment.
 ... or, alternately, anyone with a working dick. We declined the latter and coughed up the batteries. "Grime Time" is how we roll, as Tommy Gunz would say. Chief worked late night, practicing his new-found passion for slinging ink, and he had lots of willing and open canvas between the two teams. He takes the craft pretty seriously and his tats are damn good. The only thing I regret is not taking a dip in any of Hardy's 'Bama swimming holes! They looked so awesome on Insta. Maybe next year?

The following interviews quiz The Chief, Stevie, and Kalis on skating, business, and balancing the two; their take on the not-so-opposite team they shared the road with; and most importantly Adv. 1. most importantly - above and beyond all other consideration; "above all, you must be independent"
above all, most especially
, whose crew is really the dirtiest. --Joe Brook

What was the main thing, or instance, that really got you hooked on skateboarding skateboarding

Form of recreation, popular among youths, in which a person rides standing balanced on a small board mounted on wheels. The skateboard first appeared in the early 1960s on paved areas along California beaches as a makeshift diversion for surfers when the ocean
?

JT: I loved the fact that there were no rules; you could skate wherever and however you wanted. I was clueless clue·less  
adj.
Lacking understanding or knowledge.


clueless
Adjective

Slang helpless or stupid

Adj. 1.
 about anything outside of my driveway and I still loved it.

SW: Magic. I thought it was magic. It was always fascinating when I saw it.

JK: There was a friend of mine in 6th grade recess. I'd watch him skate around, and I thought it looked cool. I picked it up and haven't stopped since.

Who were some of your biggest influences growing up?

JT: In the beginning, it was all the older dudes who skated in my town. They were into punk music, and I loved how raw everything was. When I got more into skating and started learning about the pros, I liked all the street guys from the late '80s: Natas, Gonz, Vallely, TG, and Thiebaud. Matt Hensley, Frankie Hill, and Kris Markovich were real inspirational later on.

SW: Henry Sanchez, Jovontae, Guy, Ocean Howell, Marcus Wyndham, Pepe Martinez Pepe Martínez (1923-1984) was a Spanish flamenco guitarist born into a musical family, in the Seville quarter of Macarena. His mother, Isabel, was famous for her singing of religiously inspired Saetas, a vocal style which has since been incorporated into the flamenco palo. , and Jeff Pang.

JK: I would say John Pedley, Matt Hoffman, Sean Sheffey, and the whole Ultrashapes Crew from Grand Rapids, Michigan “Grand Rapids” redirects here. For other uses, see Grand Rapids (disambiguation).
Grand Rapids is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 197,800.
.

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Did these influences affect the trajectory of your skate career and how you run your business?

JT: For sure; Markovich moved to California a few years before I did, and that made the move seem possible. When I first came to California I rode for Thunder and Spitfire Spitfire
 or Supermarine Spitfire

British fighter aircraft in World War II. A low-wing monoplane first flown in 1936, it was adopted by the RAF in 1938.
, and I got boards from Real, so I got to meet and hang out with Jim Thiebaud Jim Thiebaud is an American skateboarder. He was originally sponsored by Powell Peralta and left to turn pro for Santa Monica Airlines.

In 1990, he founded Real Skateboards with Tommy Guerrero, he also runs Deluxe Distribution, the distributor for Real Skateboards, Antihero
. Jim was always generous and real straight up with me. I felt like if I was ever in that position, I'd want to treat people similarly.

SW: I would say they influenced my skate career, because of their style and tricks, but not so much on the business side.

What made you want to be involved on the business side of skateboarding, instead of just being a pro?

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JT: I've always been interested in business. Even as a kid I was hustling hustling Medical practice The illegal soliciting of victims of accidents or dread disease, to provide them with services; after being hustled, the Pt's insurance company is usually billed for office visits and treatment. See Ambulance chaser.  and selling stuff. As I started to figure out what was going on with my career, I realized that I could use what I was learning and apply it to an actual business.

SW: I skated for some D-List companies, and I got to see how business is run. When I figured out about board sales and other things inside the closed doors, I decided to take those responsibilities on myself. It's better to know all sides of everything, rather than just assume. JK: When you're older, you don't skate 24/7 like you did when you were younger, because of all the responsibilities you get. So in the down-time it's fun to do creative things, or help with things you believe in. It's good to bring what you've learned in skateboarding as a pro to the inside of the company. It's fun to me.

What's the philosophy of your business?

JT: Promote skateboarding by inspiring skateboarders. Making good products and supporting shops and skateboarders in every way possible.

SW: Integrity and friendship are first. DGK started as a brotherhood; that's how we grew up. At that time it was friends, and friendships translated into business. The business was able to show that friendship, and the kids respond to that because they can relate.

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What's been the most difficult part of starting and running your business?

JT: Two things come to mind as being particularly hard. Balancing my time between working, skating, and family life is really tough, and running a company in hard times is harsh. Laying your friends off sucks.

SW: Having the confidence to take the risk. It's just like a skate career: Up and down. Just keep maintaining what you've built and keep doing your thing. Always try to step things up from the last time; it's the same thing in business.

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What do you look for in a team rider?

JT: The best-case scenario would be a good balance of talent, motivation, charisma An earlier presentation graphics program for Windows from Micrografx that included a comprehensive media manager for managing large libraries of image, sound and video clips. , and social etiquette etiquette, name for the codes of rules governing social or diplomatic intercourse. These codes vary from the more or less flexible laws of social usage (differing according to local customs or taboos) to the rigid conventions of court and military circles, and they . You hope that if a rider is lacking in one or more of these areas, they can work it out in the time they're on flow. Obviously, you can't do much without talent.

SW: Good head on their shoulders, smart, funny, must be a people person, dedicated in their ethics. Wanting to win. We're looking for winners.

JK: First thing I look for is their "Skate Swag" level. That's a bad word for it--after awhile a·while  
adv.
For a short time.

Usage Note: Awhile, an adverb, is never preceded by a preposition such as for, but the two-word form a while may be preceded by a preposition.
, you realize that personality is just as important as their skill level. You can have a kid who can do every trick in the book, but if he's a buster, can't chill with anyone in the van, and can't hang out outside of a skatespot, he'll never make it very far. Personality is something that's lacking in today's skateboarding.

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What's the biggest mistake you've made in your professional life?

JT: Being so ambitious with business that it's difficult to find time to skate and live.

SW: Too many to count. But every mistake I've made led me to where I'm at today, so, learn from your mistakes.

Have you ever had to kick someone off the team?

JT: Only a few times; it sucks. When it's not working after you've tried everything, you've got to call it.

SW: I've had to kick people off when it wasn't good for the brand. It's not anything personal, it's all business.

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How important are making videos to your company? What about graphics? Touring?

JT: all of those are equally important. If you're not making a video or touring, you're blowing it. And it your graphic suck or people can't identify with them, then you're only selling boards to you most forgiving fans.

SW: It's important to stay relevant, staying out there with footage. If you're not out there with footage all the time, them make sure that what you've got is strong enough for people to talk about. Make your video part have its moment when it comes out, make it count. Graphics are very important. They have to relate back to the brand's message, and give people the understanding that what you're doing is quality. Touring is definitely important, Every entertainer tours. Getting to be with the people is a good thing.

JK: graphics are just as important as vide. If a kid hasn't seen the vide, they might not buy your product if they don't like the graphic. Touring is important, to meet everyone out there who supports you. It's good to connect with people who like what you do.

Do you ever wish you could go back to just being a pro?

JT: I don't want to go back, but I'm fighting to restructure my life so that I have more time to live and skate. If I had to do it all over again, I'd focus more on the structure of the business with the big picture in mind. That's hard without wisdom, though.

SW: I wish I could go back to skating curbs. Too bas the days of skating curbs. Too bad the days of skating curbs are over.

JK: I'm still at the pro level. Ask me in a few years.

How would you describe the vibe of the DGK team?

JT: Everyone's real cool; mellow mel·low  
adj. mel·low·er, mel·low·est
1.
a. Soft, sweet, juicy, and full-flavored because of ripeness: a mellow fruit.

b.
, but cool. We had a great time hanging out.

SW: Awesome.

JK: I think the vibe is about unity. We're all down for each other, and we've got each other's back.

How would you describe the vibe of the Zero team?

JT: A little more h=jacked and eclectic. But I'm down for 'em. I think I'll stay on Zero.

SW: They're cool.

JK: We didn't really hang out like that. We stayed with our crew, and that's usually how it always is with us. Bur they're down for skateboarding, and that's good thing.

What made you want to go on tour with them?

JT: Me and Josh have been homies This article is about a toy series. For the slang usage, see Homie.

Homies are a series of 2-inch figurines loosely based upon Chicano (Mexican American) characters in the life of artist David Gonzales.
 forever and we talked about doing something together; I suggested the tour idea and he was into it, so he hit up Stevie and it just snowballed from there.

SW: It was mostly just good business, and to get us out of our element. Getting all sportsman-like conduct. We wanted the kids to come and see something on a tour that was out of the norm. They could come out, support the local shops, and see two brands they might not normally see together.

JK: It's kind of like both sides of the spectrum. You have us on one side, and Zero on the other, but in that, we're kind of similar. For the kids, who wouldn't want to see their favorite skaters from each company? It was a good experience for everyone that came out. With so many people from each squad, you're going to get someone you want to see at every stop.

Was there anything about dealing with DGK that was surprising to you?

JT: Every time you'd see one of the dudes from their team, they'd greet you with a handshake handshake - handshaking  or a sincere, "What's up?" Everyone on their squad is outgoing and super respectful; not sure what I expected, but they were all super cool and real.

Was there anything about dealing with Zero that was surprising to you?

SW: Not at all. I knew what I was getting involved with and it was dope. They met all my expectations.

JK: It was surprising that they were always late! I thought with the Chief being the Chief, they'd always be on time, but at the majority of the demos DGK were the only ones on time. DGK had a few problems with car troubles that slowed us down at a few events, but for the most part, that was the really surprising thing.

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What lessons did you learn from traveling and skating with them?

JT: I learned that we stay in ghetto hotels. I kind a knew that, but every time we'd roll up to our hotel, you could see the look on some of the dudes' faces; like, "For real? This is where we're staying?"

SW: They all have a good work ethic work ethic
n.
A set of values based on the moral virtues of hard work and diligence.


work ethic
Noun

a belief in the moral value of work
. Jamie'sa good worker, has a good brand, and I admire how he runs his organization.

Who was your favorite skater on DGK going into the trip?

JT: Probably Josh or Stevie, because I've know them both for about 15 years and they've always been inspirational.

Who was your favorite skater on Zero going into the trip?

SW: Chris Cole's friend, Kyle. He was my favorite. He was ripping, stood out a lot, and was going for it at every stop.

JK: Tommy Gunz. He's dope, and he represented DGK 'cause he came from nothing, too. Tommy is ill.

Was there any skater on Zero who really surprised you?

SW: Always Chris Cole, in every way. He's a beast, hands-down. And he keeps surprising people.

Was there any skater on DGK who really surprised you?

JT: I didn't know anything about Dane Vaughn going into the trip, and I was shocked every time I saw him skate. He's really gnarly (jargon) gnarly - /nar'lee/ Both obscure and hairy. "Yow! - the tuned assembler implementation of BitBlt is really gnarly!" From a similar but less specific usage in surfer slang. .

If you could steal one of their team riders, who would it be?

JT: Stevie!

SW: We don't steal over here. I wouldn't do that to Jamie; I have too much respect for him.

Who busted bust·ed  
adj.
1. Slang
a. Smashed or broken: busted glass; a busted rib.

b. Out of order; inoperable: a busted vending machine.

2.
 out hardest at the demos?

JT: Everyone. There were over 20 dudes at every demo going for it.

SW: Tommy was always killing it; everyone was. It was a good time for everyone who came.

JK: I thought Dane Vaughn really put it down. He killed it at every stop.

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What was the best part of the trip?

JT: The demos, seeing how different the fans were and how psyched everyone was.

SW: It was cool being with the Zero guys, but just being with the DGK team all together was the best part. After all these years it's still a brotherhood, and it started for the same reasons that exist today. That was the best part for me, seeing the vision carried out with a new generation.

JK: No matter where we were, us all being together was good to see.

The worst?

JT: Sometimes we were on different pages and it took a while to work out the communication, 'cause both teams were used to doing their own thing.

SW: Between six- to-12 hours of driving almost every day, straight into a demo. That was hard, especially running on little sleep--but even with that it was still good. JK: Having to break out early and not being able to skate 'cause I was hurt.

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Honestly, who's actually more dirty? Zero or Dirty Ghetto Kids?

JT: I think for the most part, Zero. DGK is a rags-to-riches story and I think they'd like to stay up. I'm not sure if some of our dudes ever graduated out of the rags phase. We still sleep on the floor.

SW: The thing is, dirty has a different meaning to us than it does to them. It doesn't mean rolling around in dirt and sleeping five people to a bed. Most everyone on DGK has lived that life and has come above it, no matter what the circumstances were. That's who DGK is and who it's for: For people who come from nothing, but become something.

JK: I think the Dirty Ghetto Kids are more grimy grim·y  
adj. grim·i·er, grim·i·est
Covered or smudged with grime. See Synonyms at dirty.



grimi·ly adv.
, and more up on their shit. The Zero dudes are more scuzzie. DGK is on a street mentality and aware of their surroundings. The Zero dudes are more on the "Fuck everything, nothing matters" type of thing. It's a different meaning to us. Anyone who comes from nothing understands that.
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Author:Allie, Jon
Publication:Thrasher
Article Type:Interview
Date:Dec 1, 2011
Words:2670
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