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Dialogue on the Internet: Language, Civic Identity, and Computer-Mediated Communication.



HM851

2004-046060

1-56750-679-8

Dialogue on the Internet; language, civic identity, and computer-mediated communication Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) can be defined broadly as any form of data exchange across two or more networked computers. More frequently, the term is narrowed to include only those communications that occur via computer-mediated formats (i.e. .

Holt, Richard. (Civic discourse for the third millennium)

Praeger, [c]2004

256 p.

$92.95

Holt (communication, Northern Illinois U.) analyzes civic discourse on the Internet from the perspective of "dialogism Di`al´o`gism

n. 1. An imaginary speech or discussion between two or more; dialogue.
dialogism, dialoguism 
," which sees meaning as established by the struggle of representations conducted between that write, read, and represent written messages. He explains the development of "dialogism" from the standpoints of five intellectual traditions (Vico, pragmatism, phenomenology phenomenology, modern school of philosophy founded by Edmund Husserl. Its influence extended throughout Europe and was particularly important to the early development of existentialism. , Vygotsky, and Bakhtin) and contrasts it whit "monological" perspectives. He then uses both perspectives to conduct alternative readings of e-mail discussion threads dealing with the spy case of Los Alamos engineer Wen Ho Lee
This is a Chinese name; the family name is 李 (Lee).


Wen Ho Lee (Chinese: 李文和; Pinyin: Lǐ Wénhé 
 and the radio personality Laura Schlessinger, as well as Web pages of US presidential candidates and a social activist exposing and combatting anti-Semitism. In the end, he argues, his readings point the way towards emancipating e·man·ci·pate  
tr.v. e·man·ci·pat·ed, e·man·ci·pat·ing, e·man·ci·pates
1. To free from bondage, oppression, or restraint; liberate.

2.
 discourse analysis from an overreliance on regularities of structural functional explanations or the idiosyncracies of critical-cultural explanations.
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Title Annotation:SOCIOLOGY
Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Aug 1, 2005
Words:165
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