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Deviated septums may cause nasal problems for millions.

DEVIATED SEPTUMS MAY CAUSE NASAL PROBLEMS FOR MILLIONS

Millions who suffer chronic postnasal drip, bloody noses, obstructed nasal breathing, and snoring may be afflicted by a deviated septum, advise specialists at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. The nasal septum is the internal cartilage partition that divides the nose into two equal halves.

When the septum is deflected from its proper alignment, either due to age or trauma to the nose, it can obstruct the passage of air through the nostrils and cause the various complications listed above, as well as crusting of the nose lining. Symptoms tend to get worse with time, and persons with deviated septums are more susceptible to local nasal infections than those with normal or corrected septums.

If a doctor diagnoses a deviated septum, his or her first step in treatment is usually prescribing nasal sprays to reduce swelling of the tissues inside the nose. Outpatient surgery using local anesthesia is the next step if the patient does not respond to the medication.

A deviated septum should not be confused with a broken nose. The nose consists of two components: one part cartilage, the other bone. The term "broken nose" means that the bony part of the nose has been disrupted. Septum is made up entirely of cartilage.
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Publication:Medical Update
Date:Oct 1, 1990
Words:215
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