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DFG CLOSES ROCKFISH, LINGCOD SEASON.



Byline: Bill Becher Special to the Daily News

SAN DIEGO San Diego (săn dēā`gō), city (1990 pop. 1,110,549), seat of San Diego co., S Calif., on San Diego Bay; inc. 1850. San Diego includes the unincorporated communities of La Jolla and Spring Valley. Coronado is across the bay.  - The California Fish & Game Commission has closed the Southern California Southern California, also colloquially known as SoCal, is the southern portion of the U.S. state of California. Centered on the cities of Los Angeles and San Diego, Southern California is home to nearly 24 million people and is the nation's second most populated region,  offshore rockfish rockfish, member of the large family Scorpaenidae (rockfishes and scorpionfishes), carnivorous fish inhabiting all seas and especially abundant in the temperate waters of the Pacific. Rockfishes are found among rocks and reefs.  and lingcod lingcod

Commercially popular fish species (Ophiodon elongatus) that is strictly marine, found along the Pacific coast of North America. It is a voracious predator with a large mouth and caninelike teeth.
 seasons starting Oct. 29.

Because of high early-season yields, the Department of Fish & Game has recommended the emergency closure, south of Cape Mendocino Cape Mendocino in Humboldt County, California, USA, is the westernmost point on the coast of California. (Mendocino County lies to the south.) It has been a landmark since the 16th century when the Manila Galleons would reach the coast here following the prevailing westerlies all  in Humboldt County, through the remainder of the year. Areas unaffected are waters less than 120 feet deep along the mainland coast and around offshore islands and rocks.

The offshore closure will be in effect through Dec. 31, when new harvest limits will be set. But the ruling effectively will eliminate deep rockfish fishing in Southern California for at least four months; the fishery is completely closed in January and February.

The emergency measure is aimed at protecting bocaccio bo·cac·cio  
n. pl. bo·cac·cios
A large, edible rockfish (Sebastes paucispinis) of American Pacific waters.



[Alteration (perhaps influenced by Italian boccaccia, ugly mouth
 and canary rockfish, two species that generally occupy waters deeper than 120 feet.

The commission also asked for revisions to simplify the proposed Nearshore near·shore  
n.
The region of land extending from the backshore to the beginning of the offshore zone.



near
 Fishery Management Plan and also heard public comments concerning the establishment of a network of marine protected areas around the Channel Islands at its Oct. 5 meeting. The Nearshore Plan and emergency closures are aimed at preserving California's rockfish fishery. The DFG DFG Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council)
DFG Department of Fish and Game
DFG District Factor Group
DFG Data Flow Graph
DFG Difference Frequency Generation
DFG Diode Function Generator
DFG Dog Faced Gremlin
 is concerned about the impacts of the rapid growth in the live-fish market for California's nearshore rockfish and wants to prevent problems that have occurred in the past, such as the near disappearance of abalone abalone (ăbəlō`nē), popular name in the United States for a univalve gastropod mollusk of the genus Haliotis, members of which are also called ear shells, or sea ears, as their shape resembles the human ear.  despite protective regulations.

The California Legislature passed a pair of sweeping, conservation- minded measures in 1998 and 1999 to overhaul the way marine fisheries are managed. One measure, the Marine Life Management Act, aims to end the pattern of overfishing Overfishing occurs when fishing activities reduce fish stocks below an acceptable level. This can occur in any body of water from a pond to the oceans. More precise biological and bioeconomic terms define 'acceptable level'.  one species after another by making sustainability a primary goal. The other, the Marine Life Protection Act, will set up an unprecedented string of no-fishing zones along the California coast to protect marine ecosystems.

State officials and environmentalists say the new rules could send California to the forefront of fisheries management. But many sport and commercial fishermen are strongly opposed to what was recommended by the DFG and question the science and data underlying the proposals.

``This is a new way of doing business,'' said John Ugoretz, a marine biologist marine biologist

specialist in the biology of marine life.
 with the DFG. ``We are being watched quite closely by the rest of the country and the rest of the world.''

Fishermen - both commercial and sport - have responded to the proposal with outrage in public hearings. Scuba divers also have voiced opposition to the possible closure of areas to even no-take recreational diving.

``The scientists have developed a kind of denial in that they think they can design reserves without considering people or small business,'' said Chris Miller, a Santa Barbara lobsterman lob·ster·man  
n.
1. A man whose occupation is catching lobsters.

2. A ship used in locating and catching lobsters.

Noun 1.
 who took part in a separate process to create marine reserves around Channel Islands National Park Channel Islands National Park: see Santa Barbara Islands; National Parks and Monuments (table). .

``My concern is that if you are establishing gigantic closures and taking thousands of people off the water, you need bullet-proof science. This proposal is clearly not based on that kind of science,'' says Tom Raftican, president of the United Anglers of Southern California.

He cites questions about the underlying science used in setting the Channel Island marine reserves raised by the Science and Statistical Committee of the Pacific Fisheries Management Council, an advisory body to the National Marine Fisheries Service The U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is a United States federal agency. A division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Department of Commerce, NMFS is responsible for the stewardship and management of the nation's living marine . The DFG's own documents seem to acknowledge that data are limited.

DFG biologists and environmental groups contend marine protected areas will help ensure species are not fished to dangerously low levels. Fishermen will benefit in the long run because many fish that grow in reserves ultimately will be caught outside of them, they say.

``Like always, we're concerned about managing fisheries with a limited amount of data to set harvest allowances. This is one of the reasons we support the inclusion of marine protected areas as an insurance policy against miscalculating the harvest allowances,'' said Joe Geever, Pacific Fisheries coordinator for the American Oceans Campaign, a conservation group co-founded by actor Ted Danson.

Although many fishermen agree reserves could lead to increases in species such as lobster and rockfish that tend to stay in one area, they say there is no evidence they will help the migratory species that make up the bulk of the commercial catch.

At its October meeting the Commission heard more public comments concerning options for marine protected areas around the Channel Islands. Those options include proposals to protect between 12 and 29 percent of the sanctuary, an option for no change to the existing system and an alternative to include the Channel Islands marine reserves with the Marine Life Protection Act coast-wide process.

DFG staff is preparing regulations for each option being considered by the commission. Additional public comments on the Channel Islands marine reserves proposals will be heard by the commission at its meeting Dec. 7 in Long Beach.

ON THE NET

--American Oceans Campaign: www.americanoceans.org

--California Department of Fish and Game Marine Resources Division: www.dfg.ca.gov/mrd/

--Pacific Coast Federation of Fisherman's Associations: www.pcffa.org

--United Anglers of Southern California: www.unitedanglers.com/

CAPTION(S):

photo, box

Photo:

(color) The California Fish & Game Commission has halted fishing for offshore rockfish, like the canary rockfish shown here, after Oct. 29.

Box: ON THE NET (see text)
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Article Details
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Title Annotation:Sports
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Oct 18, 2001
Words:863
Previous Article:NOTEBOOK: DAVIS EXTENDS DFG DEADLINE.
Next Article:NATURAL RESOURCES TAKE A LOAD OFF.



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