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Conducting Effective Conferences With Parents Of Children With Disabilities: A Guide for Teachers. (Professional Books).



CONDUCTING EFFECTIVE CONFERENCES WITH PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: A Guide for Teachers. M. Seligman. New York New York, state, United States
New York, Middle Atlantic state of the United States. It is bordered by Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and the Atlantic Ocean (E), New Jersey and Pennsylvania (S), Lakes Erie and Ontario and the Canadian province of
: The Guilford Press, 2000. 303 pp. $25.00. Martin Seligman Martin E.P. Seligman (Albany, New York, 12 August 1942) is an American psychologist and writer. He is well known for his work on the idea of "learned helplessness", and more recently, for his contributions to leadership in the field of Positive Psychology. , a University of Pittsburgh professor, is the father of an adult child with special needs. For teachers who feel unprepared for meeting with the parents of their students with special needs, or for those who would like a refresher course in understanding and communicating with these families, this book has much to offer.

Conducting Effective Conferences is well organized. It includes discussions of several theories concerning family dynamics and reactions to childhood disability. Various strategies are offered for working with parents of children with disabilities, including many sample dialogues and role-playing ideas. One chapter focuses on working with what some might term challenging parents--those who are overprotective o·ver·pro·tect  
tr.v. o·ver·pro·tect·ed, o·ver·pro·tect·ing, o·ver·pro·tects
To protect too much; coddle: overprotected their children.
 or combative. Although I have not found such parents to be in the majority, Seligman's brief discussions are nevertheless useful. All the same, I wish that Seligman had addressed other behaviors that families find challenging, such as drug / alcohol abuse and mental retardation mental retardation, below average level of intellectual functioning, usually defined by an IQ of below 70 to 75, combined with limitations in the skills necessary for daily living. .

The book's role-playing exercises make it an ideal resource for anyone who works with families with children with special needs, including teachers, specialists, and administrators. Reviewed by Maria Landis, Quincy Public Schools The Quincy Public Schools are located at Quincy, Massachusetts. History
The Quincy Public Schools first superintendent was Francis W. Parker. He has an elementary school, F. W. Parker School, named after him.
 inclusive preschool teacher A Preschool Teacher is a type of early childhood educator who instructs children from infancy to age 5, which stands as the youngest stretch of early childhood education. Early Childhood Education teachers need to span the continum of children from birth to age 8. , Somerville, MA
COPYRIGHT 2001 Association for Childhood Education International
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2001, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Author:Landis, Marla
Publication:Childhood Education
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Dec 22, 2001
Words:214
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