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Colours of the rainbow offer a ray of hope to prisoners abroad; Schools report.

Byline: EDITED BY MOIRA Moi´ra   

n. 1. (Greek Myth.) The deity who assigns to every man his lot.
 SHARKEY

PRISONERS of conscience locked up in a Syrian jail are to receive a colourful gift of hope from pupils in South Wales South Wales south nsud m du Pays de Galles .

Members of the Amnesty International Amnesty International (AI,) human-rights organization founded in 1961 by Englishman Peter Benenson; it campaigns internationally against the detention of prisoners of conscience, for the fair trial of political prisoners, to abolish the death penalty and torture of  Youth Group in Cathays High School, Cardiff, organised a non-uniform day with a difference for the seven Syrian prisoners who were jailed illegally under international human rights laws.

Pupils were asked to wear the colours of the rainbow to school and were then arranged into blocks for a special photo-shoot.

The photograph of the rainbow-coloured crowd is going to be turned into a banner and a copy will be sent to each of the seven men with a message of support from pupils.

Prisoners of conscience are held by governments in all regions of the world. Some, according to according to
prep.
1. As stated or indicated by; on the authority of: according to historians.

2. In keeping with: according to instructions.

3.
 Amnesty International, are held because they have spoken out against their government, while others have been imprisoned for their beliefs or peaceful activities.

Amnesty is clear that the detention of any prisoner of conscience violates the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948. Drafted by a committee chaired by Eleanor Roosevelt, it was adopted without dissent but with eight abstentions.
 and campaigns against such action by government.

Leader of the school's Amnesty group Eirian Thomas said: "The group felt this would be a great way to bring attention to the fact that people are being imprisoned for their political beliefs.

"We were really impressed by the number of pupils who dressed in rainbow colours for the last day of term.

"As well as offering a great source of hope, this will send a powerful message to the authorities: that the eyes of the world are upon them, and we will not sit by while someone's rights are abused."

Year 7 pupil Sharif Nadeem said afterwards: "We had a lovely day.

Everyone was very enthusiastic and it all went to plan. It was very good fun and a positive experience."

And Charlotte Greenfield, of Year 11, added: "I thought the rainbow was awesome.

"It was a great way to let people in the school know about human rights and the way that they are abused in different countries."

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SUPPORT: The Cathays pupils in their rainbow colours
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Publication:South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales)
Geographic Code:4EUUK
Date:Feb 11, 2009
Words:349
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