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Calcium citrate malate and protein intake. (Raw Material Research).

Raw Material: Calcium citrate malate and protein intake

Indication: Bone mineral density (BMD)

Source: Am J Clin Nutr 2002;75:609610:773-779

Research: During a three-year study, 342 elderly men and women were assigned to take calcium citrate malate and vitamin D supplements. Protein intake was assessed at the midpoint of the study with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire and BMD was assessed every 6 months by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results: Researchers found that BMD increased in most people whose diets contained the most protein. Whether the protein came from mainly animal or plant sources did not affect the increase in bone density. Dietary protein was linked to increased bone density only in people who were taking supplements. Protein intake did not have a noticeable effect on bones in study participants who were assigned an inactive placebo pill. Investigators concluded that additional research is needed to see whether protein improves bone density in older people who get all of their calcium and vitamin D from dietary sources, not supplements.
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Title Annotation:for treatment of bone mineral density
Publication:Nutraceuticals World
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jun 1, 2002
Words:170
Previous Article:Calcium citrate. (Raw Material Research).
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