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CKRC RESPONDS TO REPORTED BAN BY RETAILER OF CERTAIN CEMENT PRODUCTS

 WASHINGTON, Aug. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Cement Kiln Recycling Coalition (CKRC) Executive Director Richard C. Creighton reported that the press releases issued last week by Texans United and Greenpeace claiming Home Depot (NYSE: HD) had announced it would discontinue the sale of cement products manufactured at plants that burn hazardous waste are "at best half truths."
 "We understand that Home Depot has been pressured by these groups," said Creighton, "and, as a result, is seriously considering the issue. However, Home Depot met with representatives of the cement industry only last week. At that time they were presented with significant independent studies that demonstrate the safety of cement made in kilns that use hazardous waste-derived fuel.
 "My hope is that Home Depot takes the time to review these studies and base its decision on credible scientific data rather than on unsubstantiated allegations and economic threats by environmental activists. To do otherwise would essentially amount to making an ill- informed decision," he said.
 Creighton went on to say he will be disappointed if Home Depot decides to ban these products, especially since "all the credible evidence available to date shows that the product is safe."
 The studies delivered to Home Depot by the CKRC were done by the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) and the Construction Technology Laboratories on metals and their potential to leach from cement and by a scientific advisory board that studied the efficiency of combustion in kilns to destroy hazardous waste.
 NSF concluded in recent studies at three cement plants that the substitution of hazardous waste fuels for a portion of coal made no substantive difference in the rate at which the metals leached from the cement.
 NSF is an independent and not-for-profit organization that provides third-party services through programs which focus on public health and environmental quality, including products that come into contact with drinking water.
 Dr. Howard M. Kanare of Construction Technology Laboratories presented a study earlier this year at a symposium on Cement and Concrete in Global Environment titled, "Leachability of Selected Chemical Elements from Concrete." The study showed that most of the metals tested were not detectable both when a kiln was burning hazardous waste and when it was not. Metals that were detectable in both cases were well below safety levels established by NSF. The samples were also tested using EPA's toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and all were well below levels of concern, with most metals being undetectable.
 With regard to combustion efficiency, a panel of scientific experts commissioned by CKRC recently released a study which evaluated the use of hazardous waste as a fuel in cement kilns. That study also concluded that the technology is a practical and preferred alternative to the disposal or commercial incineration of certain waste streams.
 Creighton noted that there are many products on Home Depot's shelves that are proven toxins or hazardous compounds, such as pesticides or paint thinners. "To ban the sale of cement manufactured at kilns that burn hazardous waste is another example of environmental over-reaction," he said.
 -0- 8/3/93
 /CONTACT: Martha Lindauer of the Cement Kiln Recycling Coalition, 202-789-1945/
 (HD)


CO: Cement Kiln Recycling Coalition; Home Depot ST: District of Columbia IN: ENV REA CST SU:

MH-DC -- DC010 -- 8808 08/03/93 10:25 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Aug 3, 1993
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