Printer Friendly

CHESTER ZOO STEPS IN TO SAVE THE HARVEST MOUSE.

MORE than 100 harvest mice are being released into the countryside as part of a breeding programme to safeguard their future.

Although found in abundance in southern England, the tiny creature is said to be dwindling at an alarming rate elsewhere.

Staff at Chester Zoo yesterday embarked on what is believed to be the largest release programme to date, setting free 130 harvest mice on zoo land in Upton.

The mammals, which were bred in captivity, are aged between three and 12 months and have undergone careful veterinary assessment. They have been individually marked so their progress can be tracked.

Project co-ordinator Penny Rudd said: ``Many theories have been suggested to explain the dramatic decline in numbers. It is likely to be owing to a combination of factors, including habitat destruction and changing farming methods.

``The aim of the trial is to establish a model for the reintroduction of the species which can be used worldwide.''

CAPTION(S):

DECLINING: Although found in abundance in the south of England, the harvest mouse is dwindling elsewhere
COPYRIGHT 2002 MGN Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily Post (Liverpool, England)
Date:May 30, 2002
Words:174
Previous Article:Murder accused in court.
Next Article:Vicious robbers beat man, 75, unconscious.


Related Articles
Little Krishna takes a trunk call from mum.
Bid to secure future for rare mouse.
Right little breeders.
Back from the brink.
Scentimental mice pick a smelly mate.
WALES: Juniper a real tonic for gin drinkers.
Gin supplies secure after juniper rescue.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters