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CFOs VIEW HIGHER TAXES AS GREATEST THREAT TO BUSINESS DURING THE NEXT 12 MONTHS; BUT TO REDUCE NATIONAL DEFICIT, THEY WILL TOLERATE GAS TAX

 MENLO PARK, Calif., March 18 /PRNewswire/ -- What would cause the most significant harm to business prospects in the next 12 months? The answer, according to a recent Robert Half International (NYSE: RHI) survey of chief financial officers nationwide, is higher corporate taxes. Thirty-three percent of those polled cited higher taxes, which was followed closely by higher interest rates.
 The survey queried 1,000 chief financial offices, who were randomly selected from all U.S. companies with more than 20 employees. It was conducted by an independent research firm and developed by Robert Half International Inc., the world's largest staffing services firm specializing in the accounting, finance and information systems fields.
 Respondents were asked: "What do you think would cause the greatest harm to business prospects in the next 12 months?" Their response:
 Higher taxes 33 percent
 Higher interest rates 30 percent
 Stalled recovery 18 percent
 Foreign competition 14 percent
 Other/Don't know 5 percent
 In a related question, these chief financial officers were asked: "Which of the following new tax options do you think would be most effective in decreasing the national deficit?" Their response:
 Gasoline tax 32 percent
 National sales tax 26 percent
 Value-added tax
 (tax on each step of
 the manufacturing,
 distribution process) 16 percent
 Other/Don't know 26 percent
 "The nation's financial leaders are concerned that higher taxes and interest rates will negatively impact corporate growth and investment options in the coming months," said Max Messmer, chairman and chief executive officer of Robert Half International.
 "However, recognizing the importance of reducing the national deficit for their firm's future, these CFOs are willing to accept a gasoline tax before other alternatives."
 Robert Half International Inc. was founded in 1948. The New York Stock Exchange-traded firm has two major financial divisions -- for temporary staffing, Accountemps; and for permanent staffing, Robert Half. The company has more than 150 offices in the United States, Canada and Europe.
 -0- 3/18/93
 /CONTACT: Lynn Taylor, 415-854-9700, or Marc Silbert, 516-767-3700, both of Robert Half International/
 (RHI)


CO: Robert Half International Inc. ST: California IN: SU:

GT-SG -- SJ001 -- 7286 03/18/93 08:03 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 18, 1993
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