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CARL FALLBERG, DISNEY WRITER, DIRECTOR IN STUDIO'S GOLDEN AGE.

Byline: Michael Symes Daily News Staff Writer

Carl Fallberg, who worked for Disney as a writer and assistant director during the studio's golden age in the 1930s, has died. He was 80.

Born in Cleveland, Tenn., on Sept. 11, 1915, Fallberg came to California on an invitation from the studio shortly after graduating high school.

Starting out as a gofer in 1935, he worked his way up quickly and soon was put to work as a sequence director on Disney's first, full-length animated film, ``Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.''

Fallberg worked with animator Frank Thomas to create several sequences in ``Snow White,'' including the scenes when Snow White is at a wishing well, when she meets her prince, and when she is found sleeping in the bedroom by the seven dwarfs, said Fallberg's daughter, Carla Larissa Fallberg of South Pasadena.

``He was mainly responsible for story adaptation and working with the animators, suggesting gags and story continuity and how it would all flow in the film,'' the younger Fallberg said.

In addition to his work on ``Snow White,'' Fallberg helped adapt the ``Sorcerer's Apprentice'' segment in ``Fantasia,'' and was responsible, again with animator Thomas, for the ice-skating sequence in ``Bambi.''

Fallberg left Disney in 1942 to serve as a Marine in World War II. Classified 4-F because of nearsightedness, Fallberg was not permitted to fight overseas.

Instead, he was stationed in Quantico, Va., where he worked in a training film unit with actor Tyrone Power, director Richard Brooks and Disney layout artist Tom Codrick.

Fallberg returned to Los Angeles in 1945 to marry Becky Dorner, whom he had met 10 years earlier while staying in her mother's boardinghouse.

Fallberg worked briefly in a studio Codrick founded but dropped out of the business for a period due to depression and alcoholism brought on by a chemical imbalance in his brain, not diagnosed until the early 1960s, his daughter said.

Fallberg swore off drink in 1967 and returned to the animation business in the early 1970s, free-lancing as a comic book artist for Disney and a story board artist for Hanna-Barbera and other animation studios, his daughter said.

Additionally, Fallberg was known by railroad aficionados as the creator of ``Fiddletown and Copperopolis,'' a cartoon series about a mythical railway in California's gold country.

Fallberg died in a Glendale nursing home May 9.

In addition to his daughter, he is survived by two sisters, Elinor Stewart and Dixie Edwards.
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Copyright 1996, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Article Type:Obituary
Date:May 17, 1996
Words:407
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