Printer Friendly

CARBON MONOXIDE: AN INVISIBLE HEALTH HAZARD

 CHICAGO, July 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Complaining that your meal last night made you woozy? Do you feel tired all the time? What about those unexplained headaches you've been getting recently? What you think is the onset of a viral infection may have nothing to do with the flu or food poisoning at all. Carbon monoxide is the number one cause of fatal poisonings in America. At lower levels of ingestion, it is known as "The Great Imitator" because the effects mimic flu symptoms such as headaches, nausea, diarrhea, dizziness and fatigue.
 Carbon monoxide accounts for more than 1,500 deaths per year. It is tasteless, colorless, odorless toxic gas, that can cause health problems, brain damage and death at higher levels of concentration. It is absorbed into the body through the lungs, and while by itself is relatively harmless, once inside your system it deprives the tissues of life-sustaining oxygen.
 Any home in America with a furnace, water heater, fireplace, space heater or appliance that operates on a flammable fuel such as natural gas, oil, wood, coal or kerosene is a potential candidate for indoor air pollution from carbon monoxide. Inadequate venting of appliances, cracked furnace heat exchangers, even air pressure changes inside your home that send ascending flue gases back down your chimney can contribute to this major national health problem that is just beginning to be fully understood.
 Fortunately, consumers now have a first line of defense. The Consumer Product Safety Commission and Underwriters Laboratories recently announced new industry standards for home carbon monoxide detectors. First Alert(R), the nation's leading manufacturer of home safety products has introduced one of the first UL-approved CO detectors. A patented chemical sensing device inside the detector contains an artificial form of hemoglobin, which reacts to the presence of carbon monoxide in the same way the body does. The new First Alert Carbon Monoxide Detector is designed to sound well before dangerously high levels of CO accumulate. It can detect levels of gas as low as 0.01 percent. The detector sells for $60 at most hardware and retail stores.
 For additional information, a free consumer brochure, "Carbon Monoxide Questions & Answers," is available by writing to the Carbon Monoxide Information Bureau, 325 W. Huron St., Room 315, Chicago, Ill., 60610.
 -0- 7/30/93
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Photographs available on request./
 /CONTACT: Margaret Hadley, Carbon Monoxide Information Bureau, 1-800-NEWS-4-CO, 800-639-7426/


CO: Carbon Monoxide Information Bureau ST: Illinois IN: SU:

LD -- NYFNS1 -- 7576 07/30/93 07:31 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jul 30, 1993
Words:415
Previous Article:CEI CREWS RESTORE POWER TO MORE THAN HALF OF AFFECTED CUSTOMERS
Next Article:COUPLES INVITED TO CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARIES OR HONEYMOON AT KENYA WEDDING OF WELL-KNOWN SAFARI DESIGNER
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters