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Bright future for direct mail.

BRIGHT FUTURE FOR DIRECT MAIL. Graphic Arts Marketing Information Service (GAMIS), Alexandria, Virginia, USA says its new study provides an in-depth look at direct mail. Kubas Consultants, Toronto, Canada, completed the research for The Future of Direct Mail. The study provides market size estimates, industry trends and demand forecasts through 2010, as well as insights about advertisers' attitudes and usage of direct mail.

According to Kubas, direct mail will represent about US$ 36 billion, or 10% of all U.S. media and marketing expenditures in 2004. Direct mail expenditures will continue to experience above average growth, projected at 5.6% per year, in real terms, over 2004 to 2007. In Canada, 2004 direct mail expenditures are projected to be C$ 1.8 billion (US$ 1.4 billion). Canadian real annual expenditure growth rates are forecast to be 3.3% through 2007. GAMIS is a special interest group of PIA/GATF.
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Title Annotation:Industry News
Publication:Solutions - for People, Processes and Paper
Date:Sep 1, 2004
Words:150
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