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Books to beg, borrow, or buy.

Selections to acquire somehow, some way for your association bookshelf.

In college, I had a great history professor, Margaret McMillan. She always came to every class with an armload of books to give to students to read, review, and report upon. Thirty-five years later, I often carry three or four books to share with my colleagues and to quote from in presentations. Here are some of my current favorites.

Leading thinking

It is not a question of whether the association you serve will have a diversity program but how it will be implemented. Max DePree, retired chair of the board of Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan, has packed a lot of good sense and good practice into 228 pages of Leadership Jazz. Diversity is just one of many issues he touches on in this lively volume. I gave his earlier book, Leadership Is an Art, as holiday gifts to big-thinking friends last year, and this second book is every bit as thoughtful.

Ann M. Morrison's book, The New Leaders: Guidelines on Leadership Diversity in America, is a good fast read. It reviews how a variety of businesses are dealing with diversity issues, in part through the eyes of employees.

On dark days, when things aren't going as they should, I am inclined to take down from the shelf the Brian O'Connell book Our Organization. This humorous treatment of a group of volunteers that becomes more dysfunctional as every page is turned provides a welcome reprieve.

Fund-raising insights

Henry Russo, founding director and director emeritus of The Fund Raising School, has a global reputation as the dean of fund-raising education. It is no mistake that his new Achieving Excellence in Fund Raising has already become underlined and dog-eared in the short time that it has been in my ready-reference collection. Recently the chapter on selecting fund-raising counsel saved a lot of extra research work.

The Healthy Company, by Robert H. Rosen, is a book recommended to me by a member of the ASAE Foundation Research and Education Committee. For those of us who have long been interested in benchmarks of strong, vibrant associations, this book says a lot that is very applicable to associations. Rosen was a featured speaker at ASAE's 73rd Annual Meeting & Exposition, in Minneapolis last August.

While you are thinking about who is answering your telephone and whether members are pleased with the kind of service they receive, tour Achieving Excellence Through Customer Service, by John Tschol.

The information explosion

If you aren't convinced that we are in the information revolution and that it is transforming everything that we do, read The Twilight of Sovereignty, Walter B. Wriston's new book. Today's most important resource is information. How that information is transmitted will continue to shape our lives, now and in the future.

Many members, for example, now expect to be able to retrieve information from an on-line computer network. Retrievers are different from every prior generation of information users.

When I came across an article in Harvard Business Review by Hal F. Rosenbluth discussing how he refashioned Rosenbluth Travel, I knew instinctively that there would be a book treatment of the story. So I was not surprised to pick up The Customer Comes Second, and Other Secrets of Exceptional Service by Rosenbluth and Diane McFerrin Peters. I've shared this book with scores of association friends, with good results.

New Directions in Marketing, by Aubrey Wilson, discusses business-to-business strategies for the 1990s in a logical and useful fashion. Recently I used several of the charts from this book to examine trends.

For a program that Butler Consulting Group did for a client association with many members in support positions, we liked Getting Things Done When You Are Not in Charge, by Geoffrey M. Bellman.

Happy reading.

Starting Your Own Library

The books discussed in this article and listed below are available through ASAE Publications. Prices are subject to change without notice. To order, call ASAE Publications, (202) 626-2748.

* Leadership Jazz, $20 (ASAE member price), $24 (nonmember price)

* Leadership Is an Art, $10 (members), $12 (nonmembers)

* The New Leaders: Guidelines on Leadership Diversity in America, $25.95 (members), $31.15 (nonmembers)

* Our Organization, $12.95 (members), $15.55 (nonmembers)

* Achieving Excellence in Fund Raising, $35 (members), $42 (nonmembers)

* The Healthy Company, $14.95 (members), $17.95 (nonmembers)

* Achieving Excellence Through Customer Service, $22.95 (members), $27.55 (nonmembers)

* The Twilight of Sovereignty, $25 (members), $30 (nonmembers)

* The Customer Comes Second, and Other Secrets of Exceptional Service, $19.50 (members), $23.40 (nonmembers)

* New Directions in Marketing, $29.95 (members), $32.95 (nonmembers)

* Getting Things Done When You Are Not in Charge, $27.95 (members), $33.55 (nonmembers)

Wilford A. Butler, CAE, is president and chief executive officer of Butler Consulting Group International, Indianapolis.
COPYRIGHT 1993 American Society of Association Executives
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:suggested books for association libraries
Author:Butler, Wilford A.
Publication:Association Management
Date:Oct 1, 1993
Words:793
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