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BEYOND `SCHINDLER'S,' THERE'S KEYWORD HOLOCAUST.

Byline: Dallas Heltzell Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph

For everyone from youngsters who watched ``Schindler's List'' on television recently to seniors who witnessed parts of the Holocaust firsthand, the images of that horrific time in world history will linger for a lifetime.

Whether you're just now learning about the Nazi extermination of 6 million European Jews and other ``undesirables'' during World War II or seeking a deeper understanding of how such inhumanity could occur, there are resources galore on your home computer.

Perhaps the best one-stop source of information - and a fine starting point for children - has been assembled by America Online's Jewish Community at keyword Holocaust. A simple menu contains a glossary of terms, answers to 36 basic questions, a quick history, descriptions and images of life and death in concentration camps, countless survivors' stories, copies of Nazi documents and reading lists.

In one area, the Simon Wiesenthal Center presents more than a dozen answers for historical revisionists with various political or religious agendas who claim the Holocaust never happened. Another area contains voluminous records from the Nuremburg war-crimes trials. A new addition explains the recent decision by the Swiss government to open a $71 million humanitarian fund to aid destitute Holocaust victims and their families.

One mission of the Wiesenthal Center is to keep watch on modern trends in hate and extremism that could spark new Holocausts if left unchecked. In that vein, ``The Making of a Skinhead'' by former White Supremacy Movement member T.J. Leyden is must reading on the Wiesenthal's Web site. Meanwhile, the CyberWatch area offers discussion and a survey about hate speech on the Internet - as well as some links to pages put out by the groups themselves.

The new United States Holocaust Memorial and Museum has a page at http://www.ushmm.org with more testimony and samples of its exhibits.

At the end of the telecast of ``Schindler's List,'' director Steven Spielberg mentioned his ``Survivors of the Shoah'' project, which seeks to gather videotaped interviews with Holocaust survivors. He's taped more than 25,000 interviews so far and is converting them into a format available to computer users. Read about it at the Visual History Foundation page (http://www.vhf.org/).

Fans of ``The Diary of Anne Frank'' can read about her life and times at Anne Frank Online (http://

www.annefrank.com/). She, her family and four others hid in Amsterdam for 25 months before being discovered by Nazis. She died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945 at age 15.

Want to talk about all of this information? Do it in this Usenet newsgroup:

news:soc.culture.jewish.holocaust.
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Title Annotation:L.A. LIFE
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Mar 4, 1997
Words:439
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