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Antigrams (with sources).



Antigrams are anagrams an·a·gram  
n.
1. A word or phrase formed by reordering the letters of another word or phrase, such as satin to stain.

2. anagrams (used with a sing.
 whose two parts have opposite or contrasting meanings. Here is a large gathering that Ove provided. Those without the published sources are from The Enigma (1920-) or The Eastern Enigma (1898-1920).

Abominable--Bon, amiable--Yercas, Feb. 1928

Antagonist--not against--Arcanus, cited in Dec. 1898

The agriculturalists--are ill-taught rustics--Viking, Denver, "In the Realm of the Riddle,"

B & O Magazine, Aug. 1931

Adversaries--are advisers--Gi Gantic, June 1926

Alencon--Non-lace--Hoho, Dec. 1967

Algebra--A garble--Senor, Dec. 1979

Anarchists--Arch-saints--Pearson, 1907? or Yercas, Jan. 1931

A bandit--ain't bad--P.A. Bee, July 1928

Boasting--It's no gab--Viking, April 1931

Butchers--cut herbs--Sol, Jan. 1926

Buckingham Palace--Ach! a bum place, King--Su San, June 1929

A bundle--unbaled--Larry, Nov. 1952

Commendation--Aim to condemn--Ralph, Oct. 1953

Company Store--Compensatory--quoted in The Enigma, June 1925

Conglutinate--Can't glue it on--Jack O' Lantern, July 1927

Conglutinate--Cannot glue it--Bebe, June 1932

Customers--Store scum--Neophyte, Feb. 1977

Defiant--Fainted--Pandora, "Complications," Jan. 27, 1895

Demoniacal--A docile man--Pygmalion (C. F. McCormick), Binghamton, NY, Golden

Days, Oct. 2, 1886

Denmark--Dark men--The 20th Century Standard Puzzle Book, Vol. III, 1907

Diplomacy--Mad policy--Sphinx, the Boston Sunday Herald This article is about the Scottish newspaper. For other uses see Sunday Herald (disambiguation)

The Sunday Herald is an award winning Scottish Sunday newspaper launched on 7 February 1999.
, Oct. 1, 1893

Dormitories--Tidier rooms--Sally, Oct. 1989

Dynamited--A tidy mend--Castet, June 1952

Eglantine--Inelegant--St. Nicholas, Oct. 1875

Elections--No lies, etc.--The American Agriculturist, May 1860

Evangelists--Evil's agents--Hi Herr, June 1927

Female impersonator--Rip! See? Not a male form--Ulk, March 1991

Filled--Ill-fed--Enavlicm, May 1930

Handle with care--Hit hard, e'en claw!--Hart King, Aug. 1994

Henry Ward Beecher--We brand her cheery--Gemini

(This antigram was listed as a mutation in the April 10, 1887 issue of "Puzzle Calls." Adonis, the, editor of the column, wrote: "There is no apposite ap·po·site  
adj.
Strikingly appropriate and relevant. See Synonyms at relevant.



[Latin appositus, past participle of app
 relation to the original, but rather an opposite one.")

Hibernians--Banish Erin--D.C. Ver, "The Newark Puzzler," Sept. 8, 1906

A homesteader--He roamed east--Fred Domino, Jan. 1961

Home run hitter--I'm not Ruth here--Ab Struse, Aug. 1986

Honorees--No heroes--an original, July 1992

Horatio Nelson--O, honors at Nile--Gen. E. Norre, Alameda, CA, "Sphinxdom," The Eurekan, Nov. 1893

Indomidable--I'm in bed a lot--Castet, March 1929

Inroads--No raids--Viking, Oct. 1964

Lemon--Melon--Chin-Chin, "Our Puzzle Column," The Wash. (Sunday) Post, Dec. 9, 1883

Misfortune--It's more fun--Emeline (Mrs. Edward D. Peck), previously known as Emma

Line, Fairbury, NE, B & O Magazine, July 1925

Nominate--I name not--Spud (Harland J. Murphy), Yazoo City Yazoo City, city (1990 pop. 12,427), seat of Yazoo co., W central Miss., on the Yazoo River; inc. 1830. It is a trade, processing, and industrial center in a cotton, cattle, and soybean area. Oil is refined, and clothing and fertilizer are manufactured. , MS, B & O Magazine, March 1924

The parsonage--So pagan there--Hoho, Oct. 1960

Point(s)--No tip(s)--Jemand, May 1924

Prosperous--Poor purses--Osaple, March 1925

Roosevelt--vote loser--Author uncertain; it was originally, "Theo. Roosevelt--O the vote loser," quoted in The Enigma, July 1912

Somnolent--Not solemn--Gi Gantic, Dec. 1935

Sweltering swel·ter·ing  
adj.
1. Oppressively hot and humid; sultry.

2. Suffering from oppressive heat.



swel
 heat--The winter gales--A. Chem, July 1967

Thomas A. Edison--Tom has no ideas--Wrong Font (Robert G. Evans), Holland, MI, E, Jan. 1930

Timberless--Trees, limbs--Larry, Nov. 1932

Tophet--The top--Castet, July 1934

Violent--Not evil--Spreggs, May 1951

The Volstead law--had all "wet" votes--Larry, Feb. 1927

United States--detests a unit---Primrose, "Mystic Argosy," June 21, 1902

Womanish--How man is--Hoho, April 1962

Dave Morice is featured in the December, 2009 issue of GAMES Magazine The term Games magazine could refer to:
  • GAMES, an American magazine about general games
  • GamesTM, a British video games magazine
  • List of games magazines and
. His article (on pages 6-11) "Ultrapoems and Hypernovels" describes many of his poetic efforts using various literary constraints. Word Ways readers are strongly urged to pick up a copy of GAMES to remind themselves of the vast creativity of our Kickshaws editor.

Jeremiah Farrell Jeremiah (Jerry) Farrell (b. 1937), is an American professor emeritus of mathematics at Butler University in Indiana. He is well-known for having designed Will Shortz's favorite puzzle, the 1996 "Election Day" crossword in the New York Times.  
COPYRIGHT 2009 Jeremiah Farrell
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2009 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Title Annotation:KICKSHAWS
Author:Morice, Dave
Publication:Word Ways
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Nov 1, 2009
Words:709
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