Printer Friendly

Anthropology paper abstracts.

ABSTRACTS

The 85th Annual Academy of Science Meeting

Samford University

Birmingham, AL

March 19-22, 2008

19TH CENTURY LAND SURVEYS IN THE TALLAPOOSA RIVER VALLEY, AN EXAMINATION. Christina Breeden and John Cottier, Dept. of Sociology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36830.

In 1832, the Creeks signed the Treaty of Cusseta with the U.S. government, ceding lands in Alabama. Surveys that carried out after the treaty now reside with the Alabama Secretary of State. By accessing these surveys in PDF format through the Secretary of State's website, I have mapped the surveyors' floral and cultural findings from an area of Tallapoosa County. The purpose of this is to provide other researchers with an opportunity to better understand historical floral populations, as well as potential areas of cultural interest (i.e., possible future archaeological sites). The floral environment is well documented; unfortunately, this area had few cultural areas marked by the surveyors. Despite the negative results, this research nonetheless allows others a better understanding of survey processes and findings.

ACERAMICANALYSIS OF TWO PROTOHISTORIC DOMESTIC STRCUTURES AT HICKORY GROUND, 1EE89. Cameron W Gill and Sean M Blough, Auburn University 7030 Haley Center, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.

Excavations conducted on behalf of the Poarch Creek Indians at the Historic Creek town of Hickory Ground (1Ee89) have recovered evidence of an extensive proto-historic occupation. Material culture from this occupation is largely associated with the domestic structures, and includes extensive ceramic and lithic artifacts. Analysis conducted of two separate domestic structures; Feature 500, which contains a flat hearth and Feature 509, which contains a rimmed hearth, demonstrate similar ceramic assemblages. Ceramic types from each domestic structure are compared to determine variance in types and distributions between the two structures.

BRITISH PIPE TOMAHAWKS IN ALABAMA ARCHAEOLOGY. Dr. John W. Cottier, Auburn University 7030 Haley Center, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.

Throughout the majority of the 18th century British interactions with the southeastern Native Americans revolved around a combination of political and economic factors. The utilization of "trade goods" was often accomplished to solidify relationships and to establish patterns of economic dominance. The material evidence of these interactions are often identifiable in archaeological context. Any analysis of these remains clearly demonstrates the presence of numerous metal items that were common in everyday life throughout England during the 18th century. Thimbles, belt loops, buckles, bells, and similar objects were elements of everyday usage in many locations throughout England, and were consistently utilized for trade in the Americas. Another level of trade material represented objects that were directly manufactured for use in trade situations. One such artifact was the pipe tomahawk. One of the most common was a brass body with an iron bit, and at least three examples have been identified from archaeological context in Alabama.

INSHORE FISHING IN LAU, AN INDEPENDENT ETHNOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARY FILM. Joseph Ortega and Sharyn Jones, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL35294.

This documentary film is focused on a traditional Fijian fishing method called "vono". In modern Fiji, this method is only practiced in the Lau Group on the island of Lakeba. Like all inshore fishing traditionally done in Fiji, this complex net fishing method is organized and run entirely by women. This film follows an elder fisher woman and her successors during a rare cultural event that has changed little since it originated. The research documented in this film was supported by a grant from the National Geographic Society.

PREDICTIVE MODEL OF RINGFORT LOCATIONS IN VANUA LEVU, FIJI USING REMOTELY SENSED DATA. Kelly French. University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294.

Assessing known ring fort locations within Fiji can reveal patterns of fort locations within this diverse landscape. The primary objective of this study is to examine landscape patterns in relation to ring fort locations on the island of Vanua Levu, Fiji with analysis of Landsat ETM+and SRTM imagery in order to create a predictive model of site locations. Examining various electromagnetic band combinations with Landsat data allows close analysis of the Fijian landscape. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) distinguishes vegetation density and health by examining the photosynthetic efficiency of plants. Applying the NDVI ratio to the Landsat imagery illustrates vegetation density surrounding sites providing information on vegetation that is necessary in creating the predictive model. Separating distinguishing land features at known sites using classification is also applied in order to relate site locations with specific geographic features. Digital Elevation Models (DEM), created from SRTM data, provide information on the elevation of the landscape, and by examining the elevation of sites height data can be applied to the model. The DEM along with the Landsat analysis provides preliminary evidence of probable site locations. Initial results suggest an increase in fort building around 1300 AD, a pattern that may be associated with climate change that forced inhabitants inland near fresh water sources and rich defensible land.

PRELIMINARY ARCHAEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THREE STONE STRUCTURE SITES ALONG CHOCCOLOCCO MOUNTAIN, CALHOUN COUNTY, ALABAMA. Harry O. Holstein, Dept. of Anthropology, Jacksonville State University Jacksonville, AL 36265.

Beginning in 2005, the Jacksonville State University Archaeological Resource Laboratory conducted preliminary archaeological investigations upon three stone structure sites located along Choccolocco Mountain in Calhoun County, Alabama. The Shelton Mound Complex. lCa637 and the Snake Effigy Site, 1ca157 were both mapped, and photographed. From initial observations made during investigations and information obtained from ethnographic and archaeological data concerning similar stone structures in the Eastern United States, several possible explanations for their origin and function are discussed in this paper. The Morton Hill Stone Wall Complex, lCa671 has been repeatedly visited over the last year, initial photographs and observations will also be discussed in this paper. All three mound site are believed to have been constructed by prehistoric populations during the Woodland and early Mississippian time periods.

SOCIAL CONTEXTS OF THE HEMPHILL STYLE AT MOUNDVILLE. Erin Phillips, Department of Anthropology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0210.

The Hemphill style is a representational art style local to Moundville, found in four genres: paint palettes, stone pendants, copper gorgets, and pottery. While all four genres will be discussed, the focus will be on the Hernphill-style pottery and its contexts of use. Mortuary analysis has suggested that several social identities are marked by these artifacts. Other studies focusing on the iconography provide additional information about social contexts of use. Further information can be gleaned by examining the distribution of the pottery at Moundville, use-wear, the groupings of images, the placement of the designs on the vessels, and image size.

THE ETHNOARCHAEOLOGY OF FISHING IN FIJI'S LAU GROUP. Sharyn Jones, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294.

Drawing from my research and ethnoarchaeological work in the Lau Island Goup of Fiji, I discuss how modern studies of human-animal relations may contribute to archaeological questions. I begin by providing background on my research and then explore different definitions of "ethnoarchaeology" and their theoretical and methodological implications. Archaeological studies of prehistoric subsistence frequently apply optimal foraging (OF) models to explain human behavior and to account for the zooarchaelogical record. My data on subsistence and foodways collected in the Lau Islands is used to explore the usefulness of OF models for understanding human behavior in both the past and the present. The underlying assumption of OF is that individuals relate to their environment in ways that maximize their reproductive success. Many common Lauan resource collection and production practices appear to be non-optimal. That is, the behavior goes against predictable foraging strategies with the best return for a given amount of effort. I argue that these behaviors are better understood in the context of local Lauan definitions of success and value.

THE ETHNOARCHAEOLOGYOF FISHING IN FIJI'S LAU GROUP. Sharyn Jones, Department of Anthropology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294.

Drawing from my research and ethnoarchaeological work in the Lau Island Group of Fiji, I discuss how modern studies of human-animal relations may contribute to archaeological questions. I begin by providing background on my research and then explore different definitions of "ethnoarchaeology" and their theoretical and methodological implications. Archaeological studies of prehistoric subsistence frequently apply optimal foraging (OF) models to explain human behavior and to account for the zooarchaeological record. My data on subsistence and foodways collected in the Lau Islands is used to explore the usefulness of OF models for understanding human behavior in both the past and the present. The underlying assumption of OF is that individuals relate to their environment in ways that maximize their reproductive success. Many common Lauan resource collection and production practices appear to be non-optimal. That is, the behavior goes against predictable foraging strategies with the best return for a given amount of effort. I argue that these behaviors are better understood in the context of local Lauan definitions of success and value.
COPYRIGHT 2008 Alabama Academy of Science
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Journal of the Alabama Academy of Science
Article Type:Author abstract
Geographic Code:1U6AL
Date:Apr 1, 2008
Words:1460
Previous Article:Minutes of the Alabama Academy of Science Fall Executive Committee meeting Samford University saturday, November 3, 2007, 8:00 AM; room 033,...
Next Article:Behavioral and Social Sciences paper abstract.
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters