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Academy promotes leadership for women in construction.

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THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR CONSTRUCTION EDUCATION AND RESEARCH (NCCER) AND THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION (NAWIC) are partnering to host a leadership academy designed to help women be more effective leaders in the industry. The second annual Women's Leadership Academy, which will take place at Clemson University on October 25-28, targets business owners, office managers, projects managers, training coordinators and those seeking an opportunity to "elevate their careers and management and leadership roles within their company and the construction industry." NCCER offers construction management academies for project supervisors, project managers, and safety professionals, but is -co-offering this academy specifically for women as a way to give them opportunities to move up in the field.

In 2006, 9.6 percent of workers in the allied construction industry were female, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Julie Lyssy, NAWIC's marketing director said the academy gives women in the field an opportunity to be in an environment where they can be comfortable while they get the education and training they need to succeed in the industry. Lyssy notes that women in construction don't move up the ladder quite as quickly as their male contemporaries and often it is because they lack the education and training they need to do so. A forum such as this offers them an opportunity to get the education they need in a short timeframe. And since continuing education is necessary for those working in construction, the academy, also serves as an invaluable tool for professional development.

The academy offers three days of intense training sessions covering topics such as leadership and management styles, negotiating techniques, time management, productivity, and conflict resolution. Participants also get an invaluable opportunity to network with their peers from around the country. Among the objectives of the academy: identifying the traits of a successful leader; applying different leadership styles to problems encountered on the job; identifying the barriers to good communication on the job site; identifying motivation problems and finding solutions; introducing an effective time management system; and role-playing exercises that help participants deal with issues such as conflict.

The hands-on training provided is designed to be applicable to the workplace; once participants return to work, they are asked to apply and implement a concept that they learned during the academy.

"The NAWIC leadership academy helped me improve the way that I communicate with employees and clients," said Christine Parsons of Parsons Electric, Lexington, Kentucky. "The real-life, situational scenarios helped me with valuable negotiation skills and has improved my confidence in dealing with people."

When participants complete the program, they will receive continuing education units from Clemson University and may receive industry-recognized credentials from NCCER's National Registry. For more registration information about the Women's Leadership Academy, visit NCCER's Web site at www.nccer.org.

NCCER, which develops standardized curriculum with portable credentials and helps address the skilled construction workforce shortage, is recognized by the industry as the training, assessment, certification and career development standard for the construction, maintenance, and pipeline craft professional. NAWIC is an international association servicing approximately 5,500 members in nearly 200 chapters in the United States with international affiliates around the globe.
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Publication:Techniques
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2008
Words:529
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