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AVIAT -- SPORTS COUPE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

 DETROIT, Jan. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Chrysler Corporation (NYSE: C) debuted three new concept cars for the 1994 auto show circuit on Monday, Jan. 3, at the North American International Auto Show.
 Combining the technology of items aerodynamic, ranging from airplanes to bicycle racing helmets, and everything in between, Aviat concept car establishes a benchmark for the sports coupe for the 21st century with an emphasis on maximizing efficiency.
 "Aviat began by examining aerodynamic technology and applying it to automobiles," said Neil Walling, director of Advanced and International Design at Chrysler.
 The overall footprint of the sleek Aviat is very close to Neon, but the rear seat is about the same width as a LeBaron Convertible. From front to rear, Aviat resembles one of the most aerodynamically efficient designs -- the teardrop. But the rear wheels are extended away from the body. The large scoops created by this extension also helps aerodynamics by reducing drag commonly found in the tail section of a vehicle.
 "When air is spread apart at the front of the car, the more gently you bring it back together in the back of the car, the more slippery the car will be," explained Walling.
 The interior of Aviat is designed for visibility and efficiency. The instrument panel moves with the adjustable steering column to keep all gauges in view at all times. Also always in view, is one switch that combines the radio, fan and temperature controls. The seats are lightweight, but supportive.
 But Aviat isn't lightweight when it comes to performance. It has Neon's world-class, efficient 2.0-liter, 16-valve, double overhead cam engine with an estimated 150 horsepower. The cooling modules have been repositioned to the rear to reduce drag, and five-speed manual transaxle and front-wheel-drive complete the package up front.
 Computational fluid dynamics aero development was used to redefine the basic vehicle shape in a computer. The final Aviat 3/8 scale model tested at the Chrysler Technology Center wind tunnel measured a coefficient of drag of .20 -- the best of any Chrysler vehicle yet. By comparison, today's world-class sedans are in the .30 range, and an F-16 jet fighter is at .16.
 The result is an innovative example of form following function.
 -0- 1/3/94
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Photo accompanying this release will be available on AP PhotoExpress Network today, Jan. 3 -- see photo PRN2.
 Also, a free photo to accompany this story is available immediately via Wieck Photo Database to any media with telephoto receiver or electronic darkroom (PC or Macintosh) that can accept overhead transmissions. To retrieve a photo, call 214-416-3686./
 /CONTACT: Marcie Greenfield of Chrysler, 810-576-5675/
 (C)


CO: Chrysler Corporation ST: Michigan IN: AUT SU: PDT

TO -- DE005 -- 8515 01/03/94 12:59 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jan 3, 1994
Words:453
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