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ATLANTA REGAINS NO. 1 POSITION AS BEST BUSINESS LOCATION IN 1991 CUSHMAN & WAKEFIELD MONITOR

 ATLANTA REGAINS NO. 1 POSITION AS BEST BUSINESS LOCATION
 IN 1991 CUSHMAN & WAKEFIELD MONITOR
 ATLANTA, Dec. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- In recessionary times, Business America is going back to basics. And that's good news for Atlanta.
 That was the primary message of the 1991 Cushman & Wakefield Monitor, a national survey of chief executive officers on business locations and economic and business-related issues conducted annually by Louis Harris and Associates. The survey ranks the best cities for doing business, and Atlanta, which finished sixth last year after being first the previous three years, was once again rated the best place to locate a business.
 "With the uncertainty of the economy, corporate America is looking at some of the traditional business centers," said Arthur J. Mirante II, president and chief executive officer of Cushman & Wakefield, Inc.
 Atlanta was considered an "excellent" place to do business by 24 percent of CEOs familiar with the area. Atlanta also jumped from eighth to fourth place as a location where business conditions are expected to improve in the next 12 months.
 Atlanta also ranks among the top five locations on quality of life for office employees; access to markets for both office and industrial facilities; the cost, functionality and expandability of office space; the availability of fully-serviced industrial sites; and the climate state and local government creates for both office and industrial facilities. Since 1990, its ranking on quality of life for office employees has jumped from tenth to fifth place.
 Seattle, which was first last year, finished second as a business location, viewed as "excellent" by 21 percent of those familiar with the area. Seattle continues to be first in quality of life for both office and industrial, and improved its ranking on access to raw materials to second place.
 Tampa, which dropped from fifth place in 1989 to tenth place last year, soared back to third in 1991. It showed significant improvement on the cost and availability of labor, quality of life for employees, and access to markets and raw materials for industrial facilities.
 NOTE: Ranking on the 32-city lists are based on top-of-scale (e.g. "excellent") responses. For questions using a four-point scale, ties in ranking based on the top-of-scale responses are resolved first by ranking on the higher of second scale response and then, if necessary, by the lower of the combined third and fourth scale responses.
 Non-Traditional Locations that Rose in 1990 Fall Back;
 Some Traditional Cities Improve
 A number of non-traditional cities dropped in the rankings in 1991. Sacramento, which went from 15th to second place a year ago, fell back to 12th in 1991. Norfolk, which improved from 19th to fourth in 1990, has now dropped back to 22nd. New Orleans, which rose from 31st in 1989 to 22nd last year, sank back down to the bottom, 32nd in 1991. San Diego, which was fifth last year, dropped to 16th.
 At the same time, some traditional business centers experienced improvement in their ranking. Chicago, which dropped from fourth in 1989 to 14th in 1990, improved to 11th this year. Washington, D.C., which fell from 11th in 1989 to 21st last year, improved to 17th this year.
 Another city that has shown great improvement is Phoenix, which soared from 20th in 1989 and 19th in 1990 to ninth in 1991.
 Recovering Cities
 Stronger oil prices and diversified economies may have played a part in four cities where business is expected to improve over the next 12 months.
 As was the case last year, Houston is number-one on the list of locations where business conditions are expected to improve. Houston is in eighth place now overall, up from 15th last year and 26th in 1989.
 Dallas-Fort Worth ranks third as a place where business conditions are expected to improve over the next 12 months, and first in availability of existing industrial sites. The area is in fourth place as a business location, up from eighth position last year and 17th in 1989.
 San Antonio dropped from 11th to 15th overall, but it is sixth on the list of cities where business conditions are expected to improve. San Antonio finished number one on cost and availability of labor for office facilities and government climate for both office and industrial facilities. Likewise, Denver slipped from 17th to 19th overall, but ranks in second place as a place where business conditions are expected to improve.
 How Business America Decides Where to Locate
 To provide the basis for detailed ratings of the 32 cities tested, CEOs were asked to evaluate the importance of 11 factors in deciding where to locate business facilities. Five of the factors, pertaining to the location of office facilities, were asked of all CEOs interviewed.
 The remaining six factors, pertaining to manufacturing, warehouse and distribution facilities, were asked of 56 percent of CEOs who report their organizations are involved in those type of operations.
 With 43 percent of all CEOs rating it "absolutely essential," "easy access to markets, customers and clients" is far and away the number one criterion when deciding where to locate office facilities. "The cost and availability of labor in the area" runs a distant second, with 31 percent of executives deeming it essential. One-quarter of the CEOs say the same thing about "the cost, functionality and expandability of available office space" and "the climate state and local government creates for business through tax policy and the extent of regulation" (both 25 percent), while the "quality of life for employees" comes in last (22 percent.)
 Among those involved in wholesale, retail or manufacturing activities, the availability of sites with "existing electricity, water, sewage and roads" ranks well above all other factors in its importance to a decision on locating an industrial facility (59 percent say it's "absolutely essential.") "Easy access to markets, customers or clients is deemed "absolutely essential" by 46 percent; "the cost and availability of labor" by 41 percent; "the climate state and local government creates for business" by 33 percent; "easy access to raw materials" by 26 percent; and "quality of life for employees" by 12 percent.
 Los Angeles Leads on Location Intentions
 for Both Office and Industrial
 Although Los Angeles and New York are not well perceived as business locations, their size ensures them a high profile on the list of locations where organizations actually intend to acquire space.
 Among those who intend to acquire office space in the next 12 months, Los Angeles is the most frequently mentioned location (13 percent), followed by New York (11 percent), San Francisco (11 percent), Chicago (10 percent), Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (9 percent), Dallas-Fort Worth (8 percent), Philadelphia (7 percent) and Atlanta (7 percent).
 Among those companies involved with wholesale, retail, or manufacturing activities which plan to acquire space in the next 12 months, Los Angeles is also the leader (13 percent), followed by New York (8 percent), San Francisco (8 percent), Chicago (7 percent) and Philadelphia (7 percent).
 The Cushman & Wakefield Monitor polls chief executive officers on which cities are most attractive for locating a business facility, and the factors that influence those choices. The sample of 400 chief executive officers (or their designees) is projectable to the universe of U.S. companies with annual revenues of at least $250 million.
 Cushman & Wakefield, a commercial real estate services firm, exclusively serves the needs of business in real estate. Its diversified services include office and industrial/technology sales and leasing; financial, appraisal and management services; development consulting and market research. Founded in 1917, Cushman & Wakefield is a member of the Rockefeller Group.
 THE CUSHMAN & WAKEFIELD MONITOR
 Best Business Locations Today
 1991 1990
 1. Atlanta 1. Seattle
 2. Seattle 2. Sacramento
 3. Tampa 3. Portland
 4. Dallas-Fort Worth 4. Norfolk
 5. Portland 5. San Diego
 6. Columbus 6. Atlanta
 7. Cincinnati 7. Columbus
 8. Houston 8. Dallas-Fort Worth
 9. Phoenix 9. Minneapolis-St. Paul
 10. Indianapolis 10. Tampa
 11. Chicago 11. San Antonio
 12. Sacramento 12. Kansas City
 13. Kansas City 13. Cincinnati
 14. Minneapolis-St. Paul 14. Chicago
 15. San Antonio 15. Houston
 16. San Diego 16. San Francisco
 17. Washington, D.C. 17. Denver
 18. Pittsburgh 18. Pittsburgh
 19. Denver 19. Phoenix
 20. Baltimore 20. Los Angeles
 21. San Francisco 21. Washington, D.C.
 22. Norfolk 22. New Orleans
 23. Milwaukee 23. St. Louis
 24. Cleveland 24. Cleveland
 25. St. Louis 25. Boston
 26. Detroit 26. Milwaukee
 27. Los Angeles 27. Baltimore
 28. Boston 28. New York
 29. New York 29. Miami
 30. Philadelphia 30. Philadelphia
 31. Miami 31. Detroit
 32. New Orleans
 -0- 12/3/91
 /CONTACT: Terry Spillane, 212-841-7932, or Rob Stuart, 404-875-1000, both of Cushman & Wakefield/ CO: Cushman & Wakefield ST: New York IN: FIN SU: ECO


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