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AT/COMM SUES AMTECH AND MARK IV/VAPOR FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT

 MARBLEHEAD, Mass., Feb. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- The hotly contested market for electronic toll collection systems got significantly hotter today as AT/Comm, Inc., Marblehead, Mass. filed two patent infringement suits in U.S. Federal Court, Boston District.
 In its suits AT/Comm claims that the newest generation of electronic toll collection systems known as read-write, in the forms produced by Amtech and Mark IV/Vapor, are in direct conflict with claims under AT/Comm patents.
 In the suit filed against Amtech, AT/Comm also alleges infringement on its rail patent.
 These suits may directly affect procurements in New York, New Jersey, Virginia and Orlando, Fla., where read-write systems have been or are about to be procured, and for railroad Automatic Equipment Identification (AEI) procurements now under way. AT/Comm has stated publicly that the specification developed by New York and New Jersey agencies for their region is in direct conflict with its intellectual property. As early as 12 years ago, Norman Chasek, one of the inventors of the AT/Comm system, was promoting the then visionary technical approach of two-way radio (read-write) for toll collection to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey holding several meetings, including meetings on March 6, 1981. The New Jersey Turnpike received several letters on behalf of Chasek's inventions from the New Jersey Trucking Association that same year. AT/Comm was the first company to deploy a read-write toll system in actual operation.
 Immediately upon reading a press announcement issued by Amtech Corporation describing its IntelliTag installation on the Tobin Bridge in Boston, AT/Comm commissioned Arthur D. Little, Cambridge, Mass., to conduct a detailed review of the methods and apparatus employed by Amtech, AT/Comm and others, to determine any potential infringements against AT/Comm claims. The decision to proceed with court action was based, in part, on the Arthur D. Little report.
 The stakes are extraordinarily high, as the market for this technology will exceed $15 billion by the end of the decade and virtually every toll agency in the world is poised to adopt a technology in the next five years; most now specifying a read-write approach.
 According to John Hassett, founder and CEO of AT/Comm, "We won't tolerate infringement from anyone or any organization. We do appreciate the value of competition in the marketplace and do not take this action to enforce a patent-based monopoly such as Polaroid enjoyed for so many years. We have stated publicly our intent to equitably license even our competitors. If this is not done, we will continue to assert our rights over this technology."
 -0- 2/19/93
 /CONTACT: John Hassett, AT/Comm, Inc., 617-631-1721/


CO: AT/Comm, Inc. ST: Massachusetts IN: SU:

DJ -- NE013 -- 8535 02/19/93 16:42 EST
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Date:Feb 19, 1993
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