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ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER RELINQUISHES POSITION AS THE NEW YORK TIMES PUBLISHER AND IS SUCCEEDED BY HIS SON

 ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER RELINQUISHES POSITION AS
 THE NEW YORK TIMES PUBLISHER AND IS SUCCEEDED BY HIS SON
 NEW YORK, Jan. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, chairman and chief executive officer of The New York Times Company (AMEX: NYT), announced today that he is relinquishing the position of publisher of The New York Times. Effective today he will be succeeded as publisher by his son, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr.
 Sulzberger said, "This promotion is another important step in forming the management team that will lead The New York Times in the years ahead. The appointment will allow me more time to work directly with our other lines of business and to concentrate on the further development of the company."
 Sulzberger Jr., age 40, has held a variety of positions in the news and business departments of The Times since joining the newspaper in 1978. He has been deputy publisher since 1988 and will continue to report to Sulzberger, who remains as chairman and CEO.
 "I am confident Arthur will be an excellent publisher," said Sulzberger. "He has assumed increasing responsibility for all operations of the newspaper in his four years as deputy publisher, playing an instrumental role in preparing The Times to be a stronger newspaper in the future. Among other specific accomplishments, he helped plan our new color printing and distribution facility in Edison, N.J., was actively involved in the redesign of our Sports and Metro Section and has taken the lead in increasing the diversity of our work force."
 Reporting to the new publisher will be Jack Rosenthal, editorial page editor; Max Frankel, executive editor, and Lance R. Primis, The Times's president and general manager.
 Sulzberger, who is 65 and is called Punch, has been publisher of The Times since May 1963 and chairman of The New York Times Company since November 1973. Under his leadership The Times excelled both journalistically and commercially. The Times won 31 of its 63 Pulitzer Prizes under his guidance and was expanded from two to four sections on weekdays with the introduction of a daily theme section and a separate section for business. The Times pioneered in developing an Op-Ed page for robust political debate, which was widely imitated by other newspapers.
 Sulzberger fought vigorously for freedom of speech and press. In 1964, The New York Times won a landmark First Amendment case in the U.S. Supreme Court, New York Times v. Sullivan, which established "actual malice" as the legal hurdle for libel claims by public officials. In 1971, again in the Supreme Court, The Times won the right to continue publication of the Pentagon Papers about the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam war.
 As a business enterprise, The Times under Sulzberger grew in circulation, advertising volume, revenue and profits. Weekday circulation grew from 714,300 copies in 1963 to 1.1 million copies in 1991; Sundays it grew from 1.4 million copies to 1.7 million copies. Advertising grew from 49 million lines in 1963 to a high of 123 million lines in 1987, before declining in the current recession.
 At the same time, The New York Times Company acquired media properties that now include 32 regional newspapers; a one-half interest in The International Herald Tribune; 17 consumer and trade magazines; five television stations; a radio station, a news service and other information services. It also has minority interests in two newsprint mills and one supercalendered mill. Revenues for the Company grew from $100 million in 1963 to $1.7 billion in 1991.
 Sulzberger is the son of the late Iphigene Ochs Sulzberger and Arthur Hays Sulzberger. He succeeded his brother-in-law, Orvil E. Dryfoos, who was publisher from 1961 to 1963. His father was publisher of The New York Times from 1935 to 1961 and chairman of the Company from 1957 to 1968. His maternal grandfather, Adolph S. Ochs, purchased and rescued The Times from near-bankruptcy in 1896 and was its publisher until 1935.
 Sulzberger spent his entire professional career with The Times, beginning in 1951 except for one year in 1953 to 1954 when he was a reporter for The Milwaukee Journal. After service in the U.S. Marine Corps in both World War II and the Korean War, he worked as a reporter on The Times's city staff and as a foreign correspondent in its Paris, Rome and London bureaus.
 He became assistant to the publisher in 1955, assistant treasurer in 1957 and assistant to the general manager in 1959. In 1959 he also was elected a director of the company. Upon the death of Dryfoos in May 1963, Sulzberger was named as president and publisher. He gave up the title of president in 1979 when Walter E. Mattson became president and chief operating officer of The New York Times Company. Mattson will continue to report to Sulzberger and retains responsibility for the operating groups of the Times Company.
 Sulzberger is a director of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau and was chairman from 1974 to 1976. He was a director of the American Newspaper Publishers Association, which he served as chairman from 1988 to 1989. He served as a director of the American Press Institute from 1975 to 1986 and of The Associated Press from 1975 to 1984. He is co-chairman of the International Herald Tribune and a director of The Times Printing Company of Chattanooga, Tenn.
 He is also the chairman of the board of trustees of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and a trustee emeritus of Columbia University, from which he graduated in 1951. He holds Honorary Doctor of Law degrees from The University of Scranton and from Dartmouth and Bard Colleges, and Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees from Tufts University and Montclair State College.
 Sulzberger is married to the former Carol Fox. In addition to his son, he has three daughters, none of whom work in the newspaper business. He was born on Feb. 5, 1926.
 Arthur Sulzberger Jr. joined The Times in 1978 and has held a variety of positions in news, advertising, production, corporate planning and senior management.
 He has been a general assignment reporter and assignment editor in New York and a correspondent in Washington. He has worked in advertising sales and served as an advertising group manager. He also served as an analyst in corporate planning and as a production coordinator. In January 1987 he was named assistant publisher, working with The Times's top management on budgeting and long-range planning.
 Before coming to The Times, Sulzberger Jr. was a reporter with The Raleigh (N.C.) Times, from 1974 to 1976, and a London correspondent for The Associated Press from 1976 to 1978.
 Sulzberger Jr. is deputy chairman of the Task Force for Minorities in the Newspaper Business, an industry group promoting diversity in the work force, and a member of the board of the American Press Institute.
 He has also played a key role in the development of the Times Square Business Improvement District, officially launched earlier this month, and serves as chairman of that civic organization. He is vice chairman of the New York City Outward Bound Center and is a member of the board of the North Carolina Outward Bound School, a group that uses rigorous outdoor activity to teach team work and to build self-confidence.
 Sulzberger Jr. earned a bachelor of arts degree in political science from Tufts University in 1974. He is also a 1985 graduate of the Harvard Business School's Program for Management Development.
 He lives in New York with his wife, Gail Gregg, an artist who formerly was a reporter with United Press International and Congressional Quarterly. They have two children.
 He was born on Sept. 22, 1951, in Mt. Kisco, N.Y. His mother, Barbara W. Grant, currently lives in California. His parents were divorced in 1956.
 -0- 1/16/92
 /CONTACT: Nancy Nielsen, 212-556-7078, William Adler, 212-556-7077, both of New York Times/
 (NYT) CO: The New York Times Company ST: New York IN: PUB SU: PER


TS -- NY045 -- 0465 01/16/92 11:25 EST
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